Cryptocoins mining stats with Raspberry Pi 3 model B - peppe8o

Why Osana takes so long? (Programmer's point of view on current situation)

I decided to write a comment about «Why Osana takes so long?» somewhere and what can be done to shorten this time. It turned into a long essay. Here's TL;DR of it:
The cost of never paying down this technical debt is clear; eventually the cost to deliver functionality will become so slow that it is easy for a well-designed competitive software product to overtake the badly-designed software in terms of features. In my experience, badly designed software can also lead to a more stressed engineering workforce, in turn leading higher staff churn (which in turn affects costs and productivity when delivering features). Additionally, due to the complexity in a given codebase, the ability to accurately estimate work will also disappear.
Junade Ali, Mastering PHP Design Patterns (2016)
Longer version: I am not sure if people here wanted an explanation from a real developer who works with C and with relatively large projects, but I am going to do it nonetheless. I am not much interested in Yandere Simulator nor in this genre in general, but this particular development has a lot to learn from for any fellow programmers and software engineers to ensure that they'll never end up in Alex's situation, especially considering that he is definitely not the first one to got himself knee-deep in the development hell (do you remember Star Citizen?) and he is definitely not the last one.
On the one hand, people see that Alex works incredibly slowly, equivalent of, like, one hour per day, comparing it with, say, Papers, Please, the game that was developed in nine months from start to finish by one guy. On the other hand, Alex himself most likely thinks that he works until complete exhaustion each day. In fact, I highly suspect that both those sentences are correct! Because of the mistakes made during early development stages, which are highly unlikely to be fixed due to the pressure put on the developer right now and due to his overall approach to coding, cost to add any relatively large feature (e.g. Osana) can be pretty much comparable to the cost of creating a fan game from start to finish. Trust me, I've seen his leaked source code (don't tell anybody about that) and I know what I am talking about. The largest problem in Yandere Simulator right now is its super slow development. So, without further ado, let's talk about how «implementing the low hanging fruit» crippled the development and, more importantly, what would have been an ideal course of action from my point of view to get out. I'll try to explain things in the easiest terms possible.
  1. else if's and lack any sort of refactoring in general
The most «memey» one. I won't talk about the performance though (switch statement is not better in terms of performance, it is a myth. If compiler detects some code that can be turned into a jump table, for example, it will do it, no matter if it is a chain of if's or a switch statement. Compilers nowadays are way smarter than one might think). Just take a look here. I know that it's his older JavaScript code, but, believe it or not, this piece is still present in C# version relatively untouched.
I refactored this code for you using C language (mixed with C++ since there's no this pointer in pure C). Take a note that else if's are still there, else if's are not the problem by itself.
The refactored code is just objectively better for one simple reason: it is shorter, while not being obscure, and now it should be able to handle, say, Trespassing and Blood case without any input from the developer due to the usage of flags. Basically, the shorter your code, the more you can see on screen without spreading your attention too much. As a rule of thumb, the less lines there are, the easier it is for you to work with the code. Just don't overkill that, unless you are going to participate in International Obfuscated C Code Contest. Let me reiterate:
Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
This is why refactoring — activity of rewriting your old code so it does the same thing, but does it quicker, in a more generic way, in less lines or simpler — is so powerful. In my experience, you can only keep one module/class/whatever in your brain if it does not exceed ~1000 lines, maybe ~1500. Splitting 17000-line-long class into smaller classes probably won't improve performance at all, but it will make working with parts of this class way easier.
Is it too late now to start refactoring? Of course NO: better late than never.
  1. Comments
If you think that you wrote this code, so you'll always easily remember it, I have some bad news for you: you won't. In my experience, one week and that's it. That's why comments are so crucial. It is not necessary to put a ton of comments everywhere, but just a general idea will help you out in the future. Even if you think that It Just Works™ and you'll never ever need to fix it. Time spent to write and debug one line of code almost always exceeds time to write one comment in large-scale projects. Moreover, the best code is the code that is self-evident. In the example above, what the hell does (float) 6 mean? Why not wrap it around into the constant with a good, self-descriptive name? Again, it won't affect performance, since C# compiler is smart enough to silently remove this constant from the real code and place its value into the method invocation directly. Such constants are here for you.
I rewrote my code above a little bit to illustrate this. With those comments, you don't have to remember your code at all, since its functionality is outlined in two tiny lines of comments above it. Moreover, even a person with zero knowledge in programming will figure out the purpose of this code. It took me less than half a minute to write those comments, but it'll probably save me quite a lot of time of figuring out «what was I thinking back then» one day.
Is it too late now to start adding comments? Again, of course NO. Don't be lazy and redirect all your typing from «debunk» page (which pretty much does the opposite of debunking, but who am I to judge you here?) into some useful comments.
  1. Unit testing
This is often neglected, but consider the following. You wrote some code, you ran your game, you saw a new bug. Was it introduced right now? Is it a problem in your older code which has shown up just because you have never actually used it until now? Where should you search for it? You have no idea, and you have one painful debugging session ahead. Just imagine how easier it would be if you've had some routines which automatically execute after each build and check that environment is still sane and nothing broke on a fundamental level. This is called unit testing, and yes, unit tests won't be able to catch all your bugs, but even getting 20% of bugs identified at the earlier stage is a huge boon to development speed.
Is it too late now to start adding unit tests? Kinda YES and NO at the same time. Unit testing works best if it covers the majority of project's code. On the other side, a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. If you decide to start refactoring your code, writing a unit test before refactoring will help you to prove to yourself that you have not broken anything without the need of running the game at all.
  1. Static code analysis
This is basically pretty self-explanatory. You set this thing once, you forget about it. Static code analyzer is another «free estate» to speed up the development process by finding tiny little errors, mostly silly typos (do you think that you are good enough in finding them? Well, good luck catching x << 4; in place of x <<= 4; buried deep in C code by eye!). Again, this is not a silver bullet, it is another tool which will help you out with debugging a little bit along with the debugger, unit tests and other things. You need every little bit of help here.
Is it too late now to hook up static code analyzer? Obviously NO.
  1. Code architecture
Say, you want to build Osana, but then you decided to implement some feature, e.g. Snap Mode. By doing this you have maybe made your game a little bit better, but what you have just essentially done is complicated your life, because now you should also write Osana code for Snap Mode. The way game architecture is done right now, easter eggs code is deeply interleaved with game logic, which leads to code «spaghettifying», which in turn slows down the addition of new features, because one has to consider how this feature would work alongside each and every old feature and easter egg. Even if it is just gazing over one line per easter egg, it adds up to the mess, slowly but surely.
A lot of people mention that developer should have been doing it in object-oritented way. However, there is no silver bullet in programming. It does not matter that much if you are doing it object-oriented way or usual procedural way; you can theoretically write, say, AI routines on functional (e.g. LISP)) or even logical language if you are brave enough (e.g. Prolog). You can even invent your own tiny programming language! The only thing that matters is code quality and avoiding the so-called shotgun surgery situation, which plagues Yandere Simulator from top to bottom right now. Is there a way of adding a new feature without interfering with your older code (e.g. by creating a child class which will encapsulate all the things you need, for example)? Go for it, this feature is basically «free» for you. Otherwise you'd better think twice before doing this, because you are going into the «technical debt» territory, borrowing your time from the future by saying «I'll maybe optimize it later» and «a thousand more lines probably won't slow me down in the future that much, right?». Technical debt will incur interest on its own that you'll have to pay. Basically, the entire situation around Osana right now is just a huge tale about how just «interest» incurred by technical debt can control the entire project, like the tail wiggling the dog.
I won't elaborate here further, since it'll take me an even larger post to fully describe what's wrong about Yandere Simulator's code architecture.
Is it too late to rebuild code architecture? Sadly, YES, although it should be possible to split Student class into descendants by using hooks for individual students. However, code architecture can be improved by a vast margin if you start removing easter eggs and features like Snap Mode that currently bloat Yandere Simulator. I know it is going to be painful, but it is the only way to improve code quality here and now. This will simplify the code, and this will make it easier for you to add the «real» features, like Osana or whatever you'd like to accomplish. If you'll ever want them back, you can track them down in Git history and re-implement them one by one, hopefully without performing the shotgun surgery this time.
  1. Loading times
Again, I won't be talking about the performance, since you can debug your game on 20 FPS as well as on 60 FPS, but this is a very different story. Yandere Simulator is huge. Once you fixed a bug, you want to test it, right? And your workflow right now probably looks like this:
  1. Fix the code (unavoidable time loss)
  2. Rebuild the project (can take a loooong time)
  3. Load your game (can take a loooong time)
  4. Test it (unavoidable time loss, unless another bug has popped up via unit testing, code analyzer etc.)
And you can fix it. For instance, I know that Yandere Simulator makes all the students' photos during loading. Why should that be done there? Why not either move it to project building stage by adding build hook so Unity does that for you during full project rebuild, or, even better, why not disable it completely or replace with «PLACEHOLDER» text for debug builds? Each second spent watching the loading screen will be rightfully interpreted as «son is not coding» by the community.
Is it too late to reduce loading times? Hell NO.
  1. Jenkins
Or any other continuous integration tool. «Rebuild a project» can take a long time too, and what can we do about that? Let me give you an idea. Buy a new PC. Get a 32-core Threadripper, 32 GB of fastest RAM you can afford and a cool motherboard which would support all of that (of course, Ryzen/i5/Celeron/i386/Raspberry Pi is fine too, but the faster, the better). The rest is not necessary, e.g. a barely functional second hand video card burned out by bitcoin mining is fine. You set up another PC in your room. You connect it to your network. You set up ramdisk to speed things up even more. You properly set up Jenkins) on this PC. From now on, Jenkins cares about the rest: tracking your Git repository, (re)building process, large and time-consuming unit tests, invoking static code analyzer, profiling, generating reports and whatever else you can and want to hook up. More importantly, you can fix another bug while Jenkins is rebuilding the project for the previous one et cetera.
In general, continuous integration is a great technology to quickly track down errors that were introduced in previous versions, attempting to avoid those kinds of bug hunting sessions. I am highly unsure if continuous integration is needed for 10000-20000 source lines long projects, but things can be different as soon as we step into the 100k+ territory, and Yandere Simulator by now has approximately 150k+ source lines of code. I think that probably continuous integration might be well worth it for Yandere Simulator.
Is it too late to add continuous integration? NO, albeit it is going to take some time and skills to set up.
  1. Stop caring about the criticism
Stop comparing Alex to Scott Cawton. IMO Alex is very similar to the person known as SgtMarkIV, the developer of Brutal Doom, who is also a notorious edgelord who, for example, also once told somebody to kill himself, just like… However, being a horrible person, SgtMarkIV does his job. He simply does not care much about public opinion. That's the difference.
  1. Go outside
Enough said. Your brain works slower if you only think about games and if you can't provide it with enough oxygen supply. I know that this one is probably the hardest to implement, but…
That's all, folks.
Bonus: Do you think how short this list would have been if someone just simply listened to Mike Zaimont instead of breaking down in tears?
submitted by Dezhitse to Osana [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Newcomers FAQ - Please read!

Welcome to the /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

You've probably been hearing a lot about Bitcoin recently and are wondering what's the big deal? Most of your questions should be answered by the resources below but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments.
It all started with the release of the release of Satoshi Nakamoto's whitepaper however that will probably go over the head of most readers so we recommend the following videos for a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little about its long term potential:
Some other great resources include Lopp.net, the Princeton crypto series and James D'Angelo's Bitcoin 101 Blackboard series.
Some excellent writing on Bitcoin's value proposition and future can be found at the Satoshi Nakamoto Institute.
Some Bitcoin statistics can be found here and here. Developer resources can be found here. Peer-reviewed research papers can be found here.
Potential upcoming protocol improvements and scaling resources here and here.
The number of times Bitcoin was declared dead by the media can be found here (LOL!)

Key properties of Bitcoin

Where can I buy bitcoins?

Bitcoin.org and BuyBitcoinWorldwide.com are helpful sites for beginners. You can buy or sell any amount of bitcoin (even just a few dollars worth) and there are several easy methods to purchase bitcoin with cash, credit card or bank transfer. Some of the more popular resources are below, also check out the bitcoinity exchange resources for a larger list of options for purchases.
Here is a listing of local ATMs. If you would like your paycheck automatically converted to bitcoin use Bitwage.
Note: Bitcoins are valued at whatever market price people are willing to pay for them in balancing act of supply vs demand. Unlike traditional markets, bitcoin markets operate 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Preev is a useful site that that shows how much various denominations of bitcoin are worth in different currencies. Alternatively you can just Google "1 bitcoin in (your local currency)".

Securing your bitcoins

With bitcoin you can "Be your own bank" and personally secure your bitcoins OR you can use third party companies aka "Bitcoin banks" which will hold the bitcoins for you.
Note: For increased security, use Two Factor Authentication (2FA) everywhere it is offered, including email!
2FA requires a second confirmation code to access your account making it much harder for thieves to gain access. Google Authenticator and Authy are the two most popular 2FA services, download links are below. Make sure you create backups of your 2FA codes.
Google Auth Authy OTP Auth
Android Android N/A
iOS iOS iOS

Watch out for scams

As mentioned above, Bitcoin is decentralized, which by definition means there is no official website or Twitter handle or spokesperson or CEO. However, all money attracts thieves. This combination unfortunately results in scammers running official sounding names or pretending to be an authority on YouTube or social media. Many scammers throughout the years have claimed to be the inventor of Bitcoin. Websites like bitcoin(dot)com and the btc subreddit are active scams. Almost all altcoins (shitcoins) are marketed heavily with big promises but are really just designed to separate you from your bitcoin. So be careful: any resource, including all linked in this document, may in the future turn evil. Don't trust, verify. Also as they say in our community "Not your keys, not your coins".

Where can I spend bitcoins?

Check out spendabit or bitcoin directory for millions of merchant options. Also you can spend bitcoin anywhere visa is accepted with bitcoin debit cards such as the CashApp card. Some other useful site are listed below.
Store Product
Gyft Gift cards for hundreds of retailers including Amazon, Target, Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods, CVS, Lowes, Home Depot, iTunes, Best Buy, Sears, Kohls, eBay, GameStop, etc.
Spendabit, Overstock and The Bitcoin Directory Retail shopping with millions of results
ShakePay Generate one time use Visa cards in seconds
NewEgg and Dell For all your electronics needs
Bitwa.la, Coinbills, Piixpay, Bitbill.eu, Bylls, Coins.ph, Bitrefill, LivingRoomofSatoshi, Coinsfer, and more Bill payment
Menufy, Takeaway and Thuisbezorgd NL Takeout delivered to your door
Expedia, Cheapair, Destinia, Abitsky, SkyTours, the Travel category on Gyft and 9flats For when you need to get away
Cryptostorm, Mullvad, and PIA VPN services
Namecheap, Porkbun Domain name registration
Stampnik Discounted USPS Priority, Express, First-Class mail postage
Coinmap and AirBitz are helpful to find local businesses accepting bitcoins. A good resource for UK residents is at wheretospendbitcoins.co.uk.
There are also lots of charities which accept bitcoin donations.

Merchant Resources

There are several benefits to accepting bitcoin as a payment option if you are a merchant;
If you are interested in accepting bitcoin as a payment method, there are several options available;

Can I mine bitcoin?

Mining bitcoins can be a fun learning experience, but be aware that you will most likely operate at a loss. Newcomers are often advised to stay away from mining unless they are only interested in it as a hobby similar to folding at home. If you want to learn more about mining you can read more here. Still have mining questions? The crew at /BitcoinMining would be happy to help you out.
If you want to contribute to the bitcoin network by hosting the blockchain and propagating transactions you can run a full node using this setup guide. If you would prefer to keep it simple there are several good options. You can view the global node distribution here.

Earning bitcoins

Just like any other form of money, you can also earn bitcoins by being paid to do a job.
Site Description
WorkingForBitcoins, Bitwage, Cryptogrind, Coinality, Bitgigs, /Jobs4Bitcoins, BitforTip, Rein Project Freelancing
Lolli Earn bitcoin when you shop online!
OpenBazaar, Purse.io, Bitify, /Bitmarket, 21 Market Marketplaces
/GirlsGoneBitcoin NSFW Adult services
A-ads, Coinzilla.io Advertising
You can also earn bitcoins by participating as a market maker on JoinMarket by allowing users to perform CoinJoin transactions with your bitcoins for a small fee (requires you to already have some bitcoins.

Bitcoin-Related Projects

The following is a short list of ongoing projects that might be worth taking a look at if you are interested in current development in the bitcoin space.
Project Description
Lightning Network Second layer scaling
Blockstream, Rootstock and Drivechain Sidechains
Hivemind and Augur Prediction markets
Tierion and Factom Records & Titles on the blockchain
BitMarkets, DropZone, Beaver and Open Bazaar Decentralized markets
JoinMarket and Wasabi Wallet CoinJoin implementation
Coinffeine and Bisq Decentralized bitcoin exchanges
Keybase Identity & Reputation management
Abra Global P2P money transmitter network
Bitcore Open source Bitcoin javascript library

Bitcoin Units

One Bitcoin is quite large (hundreds of £/$/€) so people often deal in smaller units. The most common subunits are listed below:
Unit Symbol Value Info
bitcoin BTC 1 bitcoin one bitcoin is equal to 100 million satoshis
millibitcoin mBTC 1,000 per bitcoin used as default unit in recent Electrum wallet releases
bit bit 1,000,000 per bitcoin colloquial "slang" term for microbitcoin (μBTC)
satoshi sat 100,000,000 per bitcoin smallest unit in bitcoin, named after the inventor
For example, assuming an arbitrary exchange rate of $10000 for one Bitcoin, a $10 meal would equal:
For more information check out the Bitcoin units wiki.
Still have questions? Feel free to ask in the comments below or stick around for our weekly Mentor Monday thread. If you decide to post a question in /Bitcoin, please use the search bar to see if it has been answered before, and remember to follow the community rules outlined on the sidebar to receive a better response. The mods are busy helping manage our community so please do not message them unless you notice problems with the functionality of the subreddit.
Note: This is a community created FAQ. If you notice anything missing from the FAQ or that requires clarification you can edit it here and it will be included in the next revision pending approval.
Welcome to the Bitcoin community and the new decentralized economy!
submitted by BitcoinFan7 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Zhuoer Jiang: Talk about the difference between BTC, BCH and BSV

Zhuoer Jiang: Talk about the difference between BTC, BCH and BSV

https://preview.redd.it/kcdq7qrjnyd51.jpg?width=570&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=af67bd46683fbe3ffa6c081d490d69598dd83bbb
1. When do you contact Bitcoin? What do you think of the blockchain industry?
I came into contact with Bitcoin in October 2013. At that time, I was making game aids, which involved the issue of collecting money from Taiwan and Southeast Asia.
The reason for cultivating the blockchain industry is that blockchain is the only industry that can provide economic freedom. The blockchain is decentralized and has no control center, so no one can eliminate it, so it provides economic freedom. The counter-example is Qvod player. Although Qvod player also has tens of thousands of nodes, it is centralized. As long as the control center is killed, the Qvod player network will die. (QvodPlayer is a Chinese-based video-on-demand playback software, using P2P technology, users can watch online film and television programs through buffering. In mainland China, QvodPlayer has a huge number of users. Due to the use of a dedicated transmission protocol, QvodPlayer is used by some users to download banned videos, such as violent or pornographic videos, and politically sensitive videos. In addition, pirated movies are rampant in QvodPlayer)
I am not a Bitcoinist. As long as other tokens provide economic freedom, I will buy them with real money. My position portfolio is BCH 40% + BTC 30% + ETH 20% + economically free innovative currency 10%, and I think that ETH is likely to exceed BTC in total market value in this bull market.
2. What is the difference between BTC, BCH and BSV?
The easiest thing to see is the difference in block size. BTC blocks have been locked at about 1MB, while BSV advocates infinite blocks. BCH advocates a moderate block size, which cannot exceed the carrying capacity of an ordinary computer. The current value is about 32MB.
Both BTC and BSV have gone to extremes. The BTC development team, Core, pursues extreme decentralization, resulting in too small blocks and high transaction fees. In the last bull market, a transaction fee was as high as hundreds of thousands of yuan, which caused a large number of BTC users to flow out to BCH, ETH and other tokens.
Some people think that BTC can rely entirely on stored-value users instead of using users to survive. This is impossible. If there are no users, there are no stored value users. For example, gold is obviously more suitable for storing value, but almost everyone has bank deposits, except for the elderly, almost no one uses gold to store value. To
People usually use paper money to store value, and naturally they also use paper money to store value. It is impossible to use paper money to store value with gold, and it is impossible to use paper money for small transactions and gold for large transactions. Currency has a scale effect, and it must be a winner takes all.
BSV has gone to the other extreme. The blockchain is enough to store transaction data, but if the blockchain is used as cloud storage, no amount of space is enough. Think about how many resources the world has to store. The result is that the performance requirements are too high, the number of nodes is drastically reduced, and the foundation of the blockchain, which is decentralization, is lost. In the end, it falls into the same fate as the Qvod player. To
Behind the different block sizes are the differences in the spirit of the three. Just like during the Opium War, the difference between Britain and China's Qing Dynasty was not a superficial weapon, but a complete political, economic, and technological gap behind it.
Both BTC and BSV are irrational and religious to a certain extent. BTC advocates a deadlock block size, and BSV advocates a deadlock protocol. The two are very similar.
In terms of rational development and serving users, BCH has won. For example, the issuance of tokens is an important function and rigid demand of the blockchain. Tokens can already be issued on BCH through several protocols such as Wormhole and SLP, while BTC and BSV cannot yet. This is a huge difference in development.
3. Under what circumstances can BCH exceed BTC?
BCH has to wait for users to slowly develop until the number of users and transactions exceed BTC. Although under normal circumstances, the currency has a scale effect, this situation is unlikely to happen, but BTC made a fatal mistake, and locked the block and locked the user.
What if BTC expands like BCH?
First of all, BTC cannot be expanded because the expansion requires a hard fork, regardless of whether it is within the community or the Core, it must adhere to 1MB, insist on extreme decentralization, and BTC must be able to run on the Raspberry Pi. The result is that the expansion advocates in BTC and Core re-hard fork.
Isn't this the plot of the hard fork of BCH from BTC in 2017? So what are these "advocates" doing hard forking again? Just go straight to BCH.
Therefore, BTC must undergo a hard fork to expand, so it cannot be expanded.
So BCH only needs to catch up, which is a fixed goal. I estimate that in this bull market, BCH can exceed the number of users. At that time, BCH had a solid foundation of users and communities. The price increase only increases the price of BCH, the value of BCH is determined by the number of users, and the price fluctuates around the value.
4. Will BCH hard fork happen? What impact will it have on us later?
The BCH community has recently had a lot of discussions on the issue of miner donations, which reflects the decentralization of BCH.
If BCH is controlled by bitmain, why it took a long time for bitmain to implement this problem? Conversely, if CSW wants to modify something on BSV, it can be passed immediately.
5. Do you think BCH is worth long-term ownership?
I often say: "Ask God in the short term, and the number of users in the long term."
The longer the time, the more worth holding BCH. BCH is developing rapidly due to the correct route. I just gave an example. There are already several schemes for issuing tokens on BCH, but neither BTC nor BSV have one. Part of it is because BSV locks the protocol and is not convenient for development. The other part It is because the BSV community has inherited the characteristics of CSW and only speaks big words and does not do practical things.
Therefore, it is definitely worth holding for 1 to 2 years, and the rate of increase is likely to be higher than that of BTC. I predict that the highest point of this round of bull market for BCH will rise from about 3.6% of BTC to 10% to 20% of BTC.
8. Free Q&A
"Will Bitcoin die due to quantum computers or other reasons?"
Certainly not, at best, replace a quantum-resistant algorithm. Looking at it now, quantum computers will not be practical for a long time. And I think quantum computers may not be able to solve the NP problem, that is, the current asymmetric encryption problem, which may not be possible mathematically.
"The impact of the proliferation of contract transactions on currency prices?"
The currency price is ultimately determined by the number of users, not by speculative users. The proliferation of futures trading has happened long ago. From 2016 to 2017, in the presence of a large number of futures trading, BTC rose 100 times.
"Will you be notified when you escape?"
I will definitely not inform. I have already made predictions. I think the bull market may end in the second half of 2021. Or conversely, this bull market may last for two to three years, and two years are more likely.
Why not notify? Most of my clients are miners, and the currency price directly affects the income of the miners. If the currency price drops due to my notification, the interests of my clients will be damaged.
"Recommended regular investment in 2019, what strategy is recommended in 2020?"
This year's bull market has begun, and it must be a full position investment. The cost of regular investment to buy coins later is very high.
"Is it better to speculate or to mine now?"
Most people can't insist on holding the token from start to finish. Most people are in the middle of the bull market, or even sell it at the beginning, and then miss the entire bull market.
Only miners, no matter what level of miners, will hold the token from beginning to end. During the entire bull market, miners are very profitable. Miners will certainly not sell the goose that lays golden eggs like mining machines in the bull market, so miners tend to make more. The earliest miners are basically still active in the market, and their wealth is free, while the earliest holders of coins are almost gone.
submitted by paulcheung1990 to Bitcoincash [link] [comments]

My career isn’t always dangerous, but clients can be unpredictable

My name is Amy, and I’m what’s called a Computer Dominatrix. My clients are all long distance, we never interact face-to-face, and I have control over all of them. Some give me absolute control, some give me specific portions with boundaries. Some are married or dating, others are single. They all make use of my talents to give up control of at least part of their lives.
When a new client contacts me, we exchange a few messages so I have some background about them, and I lay out what my services usually entail. I tell a few stories of what other clients have asked me to do for them, to help the new client select scenarios they would like to set up. Most of my clients have never had a Digital Dom before. So, giving them a few examples and options helps bolster their confidence.
The usual set-up goes like this: my client installs some spyware on their computer that I control. It gives me the power to do things like lock their computer, see their screen, disable the keyboard, take over control of their computer, and get reports of what they’re doing on their computer. With this tool, I can perform my services.
Some clients want me to watch their bank statements and shame them if they spend too much money or buy surprise things with their money as if I own the account. Other clients want me to monitor their porn usage and shame them for what they look up. Or, if I log in and catch them using porn, I should direct them to different porn of my choosing and force them to watch that instead. One even wanted me to try and break into his computer and install the spyware secretly. That was a fun client to work with.
When it comes down to it, they just want to relinquish a little control over their lives. I understand where their desires come from, and knowing it helps me be a better Dom.
Contrasting the fun times of my career, I’ve had a few mishaps and horrible things happen.
I had one client sign up for my services. We messaged a few times to get to know one another before I agreed to accept him as a client. He was in his mid thirties, single, and wanted me to watch him look at porn and make random comments on the things he was watching.
Really, not that abnormal for my choice of career.
I had him sign an agreement that helps me avoid legal trouble if they try to report me for hacking (had this happen before), and we got started. I gave him the url where he could install my personal spyware, and he followed through.
He only asked that I give him a little advance notice before I start watching, which I agreed to. Boundaries are important.
I would check up on him twice a week, and send him a message before I did saying “I’m coming to check on you in ten minutes, you better be watching something good.” I would log in ten minutes later to the second and start either shaming him for his choice of videos or praise him for making the “right” choice. All of this was predetermined.
Things were going fine with this client, and I balanced him with about 10 others. Being a Digital Dom makes it easy to spread your attention across many clients. Bonus if you can get clients from different time zones so they would log in at different times so you don’t have to multitask.
I was about to check in with another client, when I mis-clicked in my software. See, my spyware (which I paid to be custom written after wishing for more features in commercial tools) lists my clients by most recently connected in one screen. When I add a new client, it can mess with the order of the page I am so used to mindlessly clicking through. I’ve since paid for that to get fixed and sort clients alphabetically, but this time I made a mistake.
I clicked on this new client and connected to his computer.
A gasp escaped my lips as I saw what he was looking at. I’ll leave that up to your imagination. It was some of the most fucked up porn I’ve ever seen. Involving victims of questionable age. And blood.
If I could have slipped out of there, I would have. But this client requested a popup to appear whenever I connected so he would know I was there.
That popup revealed my unexpected presence.
Instead of panicking and trying to close the window, he calmly moved his mouse to the task bar and opened a text document. I was frozen while watching him type. I should have logged straight out, but I instead started to open a voice channel to tell him I was dropping him as a client.
It was too much for me, and I decided to set that boundary early on in my career.
“Like what you see?”
He had typed into the word document, and the cursor blinked impatiently at me.
I thought my voice would crack, so I took over the keyboard and typed back.
“I’m sorry, but I’m going to refund your money and no longer service you. Please uninstall this software and watch for your refund.”
He paused for a while, and I waited for him to respond once before I disconnected. He took too long, so I closed the window and took a deep breath while sitting back.
I was feeling really disconcerted from what I’d watched. It wasn’t the first time a client had tried to show me illegal things during a session, but it always makes me sick when they do. I gave the reins over to another Digital Dom I have partnered with. We take over for each other if we feel ill or something. Just temporarily.
I went to take a shower to wash out those images.
 
My computer started acting up more than a month later. So much had gone on since dropping that client that I didn’t connect the two at first.
The computer would slow down for a few minutes, then resume its normal speed. I assumed it was because I hadn’t restarted in a while, so I restarted it. That seemed to fix the problem.
When I had rebooted, the wifi slowed down considerably, enough for my roommate, Jess, to ask if I was downloading anything big. I had logged into the router to see if that also needed to be restarted when I noticed a device I didn’t recognize was connected to the wifi.
I swallowed hard.
RASPI was the name of the connected device. It had connected to the network three days ago.
Some strangers' device was on our network. And they had to be nearby, at least within range of wifi. I immediately suspected that a neighbor had brute forced our wifi password and was now stealing internet.
Before kicking the device off, I looked at the router’s traffic report. The device had a significant size of traffic in the last few days, but my computer used the most out of all of our devices. The device came in 5th place for most data used.
It made sense that my computer was using so much bandwidth, but 75+ gigabytes in 3 days was excessive.
My throat seized, and I immediately reached around to the back of my computer and unplugged the ethernet cable.
Deep, primal panic set in. This was a very specific attack. It’s not the kind of hacking you can do en masse to install some ransomware or adware.
Someone was targeting me or both of us.
Someone who was willing to spend time brute forcing a wifi password and going after one specific machine on the network.
 
I called Lucas, the guy I hired to write my spyware for me, and filled him in on everything I knew. He knows perfectly well what his software is used for and isn’t weird about it. He agreed to take a look at my computer for a fee.
So, trusting him as I have all my career, I installed a commercial remote desktop tool and let him connect. The moment I reconnected the computer to the internet, the router showed a spike in traffic again.
I had him on a call while he worked, and I watched what he did carefully, trying my best to learn what he was doing so I could troubleshoot myself if this ever happened again.
“Oh shit,” Lucas muttered. He had a traffic analyzer and computer process analyzer open on-screen. “Amy, I think you got hacked. Like, they’re downloading your hard drive!”
“They’re what?!” I began to really panic. I had a lot of my clients information on this machine. Keys that let me log into their machines. Bitcoin Cash addresses and keys where I stored my fees.
Now someone had them. They could easily start stealing and spending my thousands in accumulated fees and harass my clients.
I’d lose a big chunk of my savings and my livelihood.
Immediately, I took over the computer and shut Lucas out while I created new crypto addresses and started transferring money. The fees from transferring would make me lose a little money, but it was better than losing it all.
I also started backing up the hard drive to several USB drives I had lying around. Just the important stuff like my files, personal photos, and client info.
When I let Lucas back in, he got to work finding the process that was exfiltrating my data and shutting it down. He tracked down the executable that was running the show and downloaded it to his own computer before deleting it from mine.
He promised to dissect it as best he could to figure out what it was doing.
Before he did that, however, he started monitoring my system to make sure the virus had been truly cleared out.
While watching my system, he gave me a task.
“Walk around your apartment. Search everywhere and look for that rogue device. It’s been continuously connected for days, which means whoever is doing this is probably not camped out on the road. From the name, I’d guess it’s a Raspberry Pi -- a small computer about the size of a phone but two inches tall.”
He sent me a picture of the type of device we were looking for.
“They probably left it hidden somewhere, either connected to an outlet or with a large battery pack. Go and look for it,” he insisted.
I got Jess to help me search the place top to bottom. Nothing. Not even outside in the bushes or on the back porch.
We split up and went to our neighbors, asking if they’d seen anyone suspicious hanging around the building in the last week. No one on our floor had. I went upstairs and asked the same questions.
Our upstairs neighbor said the only person he’d seen was a guy coming to update their satellite dish on the balcony. My throat seized up as I realized that could be them.
I asked hesitantly if I could look at their dish. I didn’t know them, but briefly explained that someone had left a device lying around that was breaking into our wifi and that our next step was to call the police.
They panicked at that, and let me check their balcony if I promised to keep them out of it if I called the cops. I agreed, knowing full well that they did drugs and would hate for the police to come around the apartment complex.
There, on the balcony, was exactly what Lucas had told me to look for. A black box sat along the wall between the satellite and the wall the cable ran into. A power cord exited the box and connected to an outlet on the balcony.
I cracked open the box with my fingers and found a circuit board inside, connected via usb to the outlet. The satellite cable passed straight through the box without connecting to anything. The box was a fake, made to look like it was doing something to the cable as it passed through.
The circuit board looked exactly like the picture Lucas had shown me.
There was our rogue device.
I unplugged the device, fully aware that unplugging it would alert whoever was controlling it. They could assume it was disconnected accidentally, or they would think I had found it. Either way, I couldn’t just leave it.
I thanked the neighbors and left with the whole box. Jess met me on the stairs, saying that Lucas had asked her to disconnect the internet on the computer and have me call him back.
Jess stared in wide-eyed shock as I showed her what I’d found. The upstairs neighbors were well within range of our wifi for the device to connect. The job was only barely sloppy enough to detect. We were lucky I had found it at all.
 
On the phone Lucas sounded panicked.
“They didn’t just copy your hard drive, they added files to it,” he squeaked. “Bad files. Bad pictures.”
My jaw tightened, and I felt sick. I made the connection to the client I’d dropped.
“Delete all your shit now,” Lucas was demanding. “You already backed up what you want, you need to destroy that hard drive. Smash it, burn it, bury it. Go get a new hard drive. Start as fresh as you can. I can help you get set back up if you want.”
“I think I know what’ll happen,” I muttered. “He’ll call the police on me and tip them off that I have those… pictures. They’ll find it and arrest me for possession. Game over.”
“He? You know who it is?” Lucas pressed.
I told him about the client I’d dropped.
“That’s why you need to torch your hard drives. Now. Both of you. Same with your phones. Who knows where else he’s been,” was Lucas’ advice.
I won’t confirm or deny what I did with the hard drive or the device. If I destroyed it, it would technically be destruction of evidence.
I ordered a new hard drive and reinstalled everything. I explained to my clients that I had lost internet connection for a couple of days, and didn’t end up losing any clients.
I haven’t told the police everything. The last time I got involved with them, there was so much harassment from them about my career that I’d rather not have more negative interactions with them. It just isn’t worth it in this case. I kept my report short and simple: a guy I met online and dumped might try something and come to my house. I gave them the information the client gave me, but I suspect more and more that it was fake.
Making a report will help if anything new happens.
I’ve written about this before on other anonymous forums, specifically for other Doms. Because of those posts, a few journalists have reached out and are writing features based on me, my career, and these events. They should be published in the next few days.
I’m just interested in sharing stories like this as publicly as possible, for awareness.
Lucas explained that the Raspberry Pi was a tiny computer that had a cellular connection so the client could connect to it from anywhere in the world and try to break into my wifi. Once he had succeeded, the client had gone to work breaking into my computer and getting their malware installed. We still don’t know 100% how he did it.
Lucas worked tirelessly to revise his software and remove vulnerabilities that could be used to trace me. We don’t know which vulnerabilities the client used, if any. We do know that there is one left, however.
I know this because every once in a while, a client will show up in my software who I didn’t sign up. A new name and data every time. I don’t dare click it. I just know what will be waiting for me upon connection.
“Like what you see?”
Lucas hasn’t been able to track down how he’s injecting fake clients into the software. Until Lucas can fix it, all I can do is click carefully and not connect again by accident. I’m sure the client is using a modified version of my spyware, ready to do all kinds of damage the moment I connect.
The guy is clearly an expert. Who knows how many other people he’s done something like this to. One thing is certain: he was prepared to conduct this attack.
My career isn’t always dangerous, but the clients can be unpredictable.
submitted by DigitDom to nosleep [link] [comments]

Why Runelite's GPU renderer is one of the most important improvements to OSRS ever.

In a world of "gameplay versus graphics", a GPU renderer improves both

Not only does this new GPU renderer improve game responsiveness and framerate by a huge amount, but it's going to be so radically more efficient that it can afford to have longer draw distances. Not just this, but these distant map tiles will be clickable! Very exciting - every single task, skill, and activity will be smoother and more enjoyable.
Disclaimer: This language and information has been simplified for average gamers. Go away, sweaty "AKTHUALLY" brainlets.

OSRS currently uses a CPU renderer straight out of 2003

It's really REALLY bad! At least, by modern standards. It could not be more opposite to what modern computers pursue. It's not Jagex's fault, it's just old... Very VERY old! It's a huge undertaking, and Jagex has been too busy knocking mobile absolutely out of the park, and I'd do the same if I were them - so don't think this is some kind of rag on Jagex. Anyways, some may be surprised that this renderer is still managing to hurt computers today. How can software first written in 2003-2004 (FOR COMPUTERS OF THAT ERA) be laggy and stuttery on computers today? The answer is simple: resizable mode, and individual CPU core speed.
Resizable mode takes a game window that used to be 765x503 (the majority of which used to be a fixed GUI canvas, but not with the new mode!) and renders it at resolutions as high as 3840x2160, maybe even higher. Do you know how many pixels that is? Over 8 million. Do you know how many pixels the original renderer was designed to expect? Just under 390,000. That's over 21x the work being thrown at modern CPUs. Cores aren't anywhere near 21x faster than they were at the close of the single-core era, which is why players with 4k monitors need to see therapists after long play sessions.
Surely CPUs have gotten faster since the mid 2000s! They have, but not quite in the way that a single-threaded(single core) CPU renderer would expect... CPU manufacturers have been focusing on power draw, temperatures, core count, and special architectural improvements like GPU integration and controller integration. Comparatively, improving individual core speed hasn't been as much of a focus as it had been prior to the multi-core era -and no, I'm not talking about the useless gigahertz(TM) meme measurement, I'm talking about actual overall work done by the core. As a result, the CPUs we have today have developed down a much different path than what this CPU renderer would benefit from. Not nearly the amount that resizable mode demands. Especially considering these CPU cores were designed to assume that things didn't pile all their work onto just one core.
We're throwing over 21x the work at CPUs that, in most cases, have only been getting 5-15% faster per-core performance every year.

What is a "frame"?

Think of a frame as a painting. Your GPU renderer (or CPU cough cough) is responsible for using your GPU to paint an empty canvas, and turn it into a beautiful and complete picture. First, it draws the skybox(if there is one, it's gonna just fill with black in the case of OSRS). Then, it draws all the visible geometry from back to front, with all the lighting and effects. Then, it draws the GUI elements over the top. It does everything, one pixel at a time. Its job is to draw these paintings as quickly as possible (ideally, so you perceive movement) and present them to your monitor, one at a time, forever... until you close the game. Think of a GPU renderer as a talented artist with hundreds of arms (GPU cores).
If your GPU is able to paint this picture in 16.6 milliseconds (frame time measurements are always in milliseconds), then you'll have a frame rate of 60 frames per second, as 1000 ms / 16.6 is 60. Sometimes your renderer struggles, though. Sometimes it can only complete a frame in 100 milliseconds (10FPS). You can't wave a magic want when this happens. If you want a higher framerate, you need to either update your hardware, or change your software. By change software, I mean either make it more efficient at the work it's told to do, or give it less work. RuneLite has done the former. An example of the latter would be lowering resolution, turning graphical details down, turning off filtering, etc. Games usually call this set of controls the "Graphics settings". Luckily, OSRS is so lightweight it will likely never need a graphics settings menu.
(Think of a CPU renderer as a painter with no artistic ability and, in the case of quad core, four arms...but he's only allowed to paint with one, while the other 3 sit idle. Also, he has to constantly stop painting to return to his normal duties! No fun! The CPU is better off at its own desk, letting the GPU handle the painting.)

A GPU renderer improves frame rates

Not that this matters currently, as the game is capped at 50FPS anyways... but it's still going to be huge for low-end systems or high-end systems with high res monitors. There's also the future, though... Once a GPU renderer is out, it could be possible that they could someday uncap the framerate (which, according to mod atlas, is only the character's camera as all animations are 2FPS anyways).
I expect that an update like this will make fixed mode a solid 50FPS on literally everything capable of executing the game. Fixed mode was already easy to run on everything except for old netbooks and Windows Vista desktops, so this really wouldn't be a surprise.

A GPU renderer improves frame times

Frame times are just as important as frame rates. Your frame rate is how many frames are drawn over the course of a second. But, as described previously, each "painting" is done individually. Sometimes the painter takes longer to do something! What if there's a glowing projectile flying past the camera, or something else momentary that's intensive? The painter has to take the time to paint that, resulting in a handful of frames over the course of that second taking much more time than the others. When your frame rate is high and frame times are consistent, this is perceived as incredibly smooth motion.
Ideally, all of our frames are completed in the same amount of time, but this isn't the case. Sometimes "distractions" will come up, and cause the painter to devote an extra 10-20ms to it before returning to the rest of the painting. In bad scenarios, this actually becomes visible, and is referred to as micro stutter. Having a dedicated GPU renderer doing the work ensures this is very uncommon. A GPU has hundreds or thousands of cores. If some get distracted, others reach out and pick up the workload. Everything is smooth, distributed, and uninterrupted.
You may recall Mod Atlas talking about frame times when he posted about his GPU renderer last year: https://twitter.com/JagexAtlas/status/868131325114552321
Notice the part where he says it takes 25+ms on the CPU, but only takes 4-5ms on the GPU! That's 200-250 frames per second, if the framerate were uncapped! Also, side note: Just because a frame is completed in 1ms doesn't always mean your framerate will be 1000FPS. If your framerate is capped, then the painter will sit and wait after completing and presenting a frame until it's time to start painting again. This is why capping your framerate can be good for power usage, as demonstrated on mobile! Your GPU can't suck up your battery if it's asleep 90% of the time!

A GPU renderer is more efficient

Instead of piling all computational workloads and graphical workloads onto one single CPU core (rest in peace 8+ core users), a GPU renderer takes graphical work off the CPU and does it itself. I'd estimate the majority of all the work was graphical, so this will make a pretty noticeable difference in performance, especially on older systems. Before, having OSRS open while using other software would have a noticeable performance impact on everything. Especially on older computers. Not anymore! CPUs will run cooler, software will run better, and your computer may even use less power overall, since GPUs are much better at efficient graphical work than CPUs are!

All computers are already equipped to run this very VERY well

Most of the computers we have today are designed with two things: a good GPU, and an okay CPU. This isn't 2003 anymore. GPUs have made their way into everything, and they're prioritized over CPUs. They're not used just for games anymore, entire operating systems rely on them not just for animations and graphical effects, but entire computing tasks. GPUs are responsible for everything from facial recognition to Bitcoin mining these days. Not having a good one in your computer will leave you with a pretty frustrating experience - which is why every manufacturer makes sure you have one. Now, thanks to RuneLite, these will no longer be sitting idle while your poor CPU burns itself alive.

This new GPU renderer will make OSRS run much better on low end systems

Low end systems are notorious for having garbage like Intel Atom or Celeron in them. Their GPU is alright, but the CPU is absolutely terrible. Using the GPU will give them a boost from 5-15FPS in fixed mode, to around 50. At least, assuming they were made after the GPGPU revolution around 2010.

This new GPU renderer will make OSRS run much better on high end systems

High end systems tend to have huge GPUs and huge monitors. Right now, your GPU is asleep while your 4k monitor brings the current CPU renderer to its knees, on the verge of committing sudoku. Letting your GPU take on all that work will make your big and beautiful monitor handle OSRS without lag or stutter.

This new GPU renderer will open the possibility of plugins that build on top of it

One that comes to mind is a 2x/3x/4x GUI scaler. Scaling things in a graphics API is much easier than scaling it in some convoluded custom CPU renderer that was first designed to run in Internet Explorer 5.

It's easier to customize graphical variables in a GPU renderer than it is a glitchy old CPU renderer

Want night time? Change the light intensity. Want cel-shaded comic book appearance for some stupid reason? It's easy. Want to hit 60FPS on a Raspberry Pi? Change your render distance to 2 tiles. Now that the graphical work has been offloaded to a graphics API that's been literally designed to easily modify these things, the sky is the limit. See my past posts on this topic:
Big round of applause for the RuneLite team, and Jagex for allowing them to continue development. Without RuneLite, OSRS would be half the game it is today. Here's to their continued success, with or without Jagex integrating their code into the main game!
submitted by Tizaki to 2007scape [link] [comments]

Your guide to NYZO

NYZO is the highly efficient Proof-of-Diversity (PoD) blockchain for everyday spending.
NYZO has been developed from the ground up, it is an open-source initiative and isn't a copy of any existing blockchain project.
The network has been running for more then one year now and the source code can be found on GitHub. The NYZO codebase is going to start acting as an API server. This will be run-mode dependent, just like the various web server functions that are available now. It will interact with the mesh on one side and whatever it needs to interact with on the other side.
Developers update NYZO all the time with fixes and performance and stability improvements. Every update which has been created for the network so far has been accompanied by a release note, a detailed document detailing every change to the network to make it better.
We can find these release notes on the website of the developers: What's new? - as you can see, the network has been worked on on a regular basis and each release note is multiple pages long - developers are dedicated to making this a success and this is their testament.
Whitepaper 
Proof-of-Diversity (PoD) consensus mechanism requires active participation in the form of time and verifier behaviour in the blockchain to be allowed to exert a certain influence on the system as a whole. The Proof-of-Diversity blockchain uses verification cycles to establish the authoritative form of the blockchain. The basic concept of proof-of-diversity is simple. Verifiers take turns producing blocks in a circular order. Some simple rules ensure that verifiers are neither added to nor removed from that circular order too quickly. In order to produce a believable forgery of the blockchain for any meaningful amount of time, an attacker would need to obtain more than half of the private keys of verifiers currently working on the blockchain. The design and technology are simple and clearly explained in NYZO whitepaper. This document was created in the very beginning and it might not cover all aspects as it should, the release notes make up for this.
Still too lazy and didn't read NYZO whitepaper? Relax, and listen to the soothing audio version.
Verifier 
Mesh (cycle) participants are called verifiers. Verifiers are in charge of verifying transactions and producing blocks. In exchange for securing the network, verifiers collect transaction fees which are distributed fairly among all of them. Each verifier gets a chance to verify one block in one mesh cycle. NYZO don't need mining equipment and large amounts of processing power like others, only unique IP address and always on Linux VPS is required.
Sentinel 
The purpose of the NYZO Sentinel is to provide improve stability of the cycle by producing blocks for in-cycle verifiers that are unable to produce blocks due to temporary hardware and network issues. The Sentinel should not be run on an instance that is running the verifier. The NYZO sentinel is a seperate version of the nyzoVerifier designed to protect your in-cycle verifiers. Its job is to constantly check up on your verifiers. If one of them is unresponsive, the sentinel will initiate communication on behalf of the verifier, this all to ensure future cycle inclusion.
The Mesh (cycle) 
is simply a network of computers known as verifiers all running NYZO and communicating information to each other. The Mesh (cycle) is a central point of PoD system. For securing the Mesh these computers are given 10% reward of transaction fees for each block they secure.
Check your NYZO verifier status, search for your nickname or IP
Newcomers can sometimes get confused with how Nyzo verifier lifecycle works in practice or how to join the cycle.
Block files 
One part of the consensus algorithm is the block consolidation process which ensures that a small machine such as a Rock64 Pro or a beefy Raspberry Pi can run a NYZO verifier with little storage space. 1000 blocks are consolidated into 500 Kb of storage space. Very efficient.
51% attack resistance and energy efficiency 
NYZO has a properly designed economic model that relies on time. Therefore, the cost for 51% attacks (relative to market cap) is huge, there is ongoing incentive to participate in the network, and attacks based on computing power (PoW) or ownership of token (PoS) aren't feasible. NYZO uses only a tiny fraction of Bitcoin’s resources while performing the same tasks. 58 000 000 000 kwH - 58 TWh : current BTC power cons. per year vs 36500 kwH - 0.0000365 TWh : current NYZO power cons. per year = 1,589,041 times more efficient and 51% attack resistant.
Roadmap 
NYZO developers have been asked many times for a roadmap. The roadmap is to keep making the code more stable, more robust, and more efficient.
Nyzo development: 15 months of hard work (and beyond)
Scalability 
NYZO doesn’t require any Layer 2 scaling solutions and is able to handle high transaction volumes per second which is only dependent on the performance of the verifiers in the mesh. The block time is 7 seconds and block size is 28 Kb.
Micropay is a lightweight way of using NYZO that shifts as much burden as possible to the person receiving the payment to make it as easy as possible for someone to send small payments. Next step is an API server for Micropay.
Useful guides and articles 
2k verifiers/nodes are in the cycle and 24k verifiers are patiently waiting to join the mesh/cycle. Following video tutorials will explain in detail how to set up your own NYZO mesh verifier node. For more information about set up visit Nyzo DISCORD.
VIDEO TUTORIAL - How to setup a NYZO verifier and sentinel on a VPS - video tutorial from Refortuna Analytics
VIDEO TUTORIAL - How to set up a Nyzo Verifier on Hetzner - from community website Nyzo.io
Nyzo review and guide how to set up verifier - very detailed review and guide by MyAltcoins.info
Nyzo - Time and diversity as a currency (+ 4 translations here) This article goes into detail about the consensus algorithm and its benefits, it sketches a hypothetical attack scenario and the cost of an attack at this point in time (while the market cap is still low).
Arguments against early entrants This article goes into detail about the early stages of the project, what has happened, how certain events have unfolded and the diversity of the project, it creates a parallel between Bitcoin and NYZO to cover an important aspect of the network in detail.
Time An article going deeper into the time aspect of the network, written by a community member
Ethereum An article comparing NYZO’s consensus algorithm to the development state of Ethereum, written by the same user as the article above.
Bitcoin Yet again an article comparing NYZO, this time with Bitcoin.
Proof of Diversity - A novel solution for limitless blockchain scalability | Micky.com.au
Thoughts on Tor and Nyzo
Developer fund 
The initial developer fund plan can be found here, this has been followed up and the details have changed. The developers effectively own 0.6% of the total supply. So far around 11 million has been “mined” and the remainder is spendable by the network through governed voting, with a minimum amount of votes required for NYZO to be released (51% of the network needs to agree).
IMPORTANT LINKS: 
Official website
Nyzo mobile wallet for Android phones on Google Play - Multilingual support (EN, DE, CN, ES, FR, RU, NL, HR) - developed by ThreeDots Technologies
Nyzo key tool and Web wallet
Nyzo Space - Paper wallet - developed by Angainor Dev
Nyzo DISCORD - There are currently 1600 active members and developers in the discord group with multiple joining every day. Most of the community communicates here. Here is where you’re guaranteed to have a one-on-one with the developers.
GitHub
New Community Forum website (You can get here lots of useful information. If you are ready to build for Nyzo and get paid, please read this article... Nyzo and its protocol which facilitates building)
Chinese Community website NYZO社区
Nyzo Twitter
Nyzo Gang Twitter
Facebook
Telegram
Instagram
Tumblr
Reddit
Bitcointalk
Weibo
QQ: 1007477423
Zedge
NYZO wallpapers for desktop and mobile devices
Trading: 
qTrade
BILAXY
Hotbit
QBTC
Citex
BiHodl


https://preview.redd.it/brh7hm2n6m241.png?width=2560&format=png&auto=webp&s=8d8b45235fcc34200bcad5603249ae49a89c2612
submitted by Mobilenewsflash to CryptoMoonShots [link] [comments]

What is NYZO?

What is NYZO?
NYZO is a highly efficient Proof-of-Diversity (PoD) blockchain for everyday spending.
NYZO has been developed from the ground up, it is an open-source initiative and isn't a copy of any existing blockchain project.
The network has been running for more than one year now and the source code can be found on GitHub. The NYZO codebase is going to start acting as an API server. This will be run-mode dependent, just like the various web server functions that are available now. It will interact with the mesh on one side and whatever it needs to interact with on the other side.
Developers update NYZO all the time with fixes and performance and stability improvements. Every update which has been created for the network so far has been accompanied by a release note, a detailed document detailing every change to the network to make it better.
We can find these release notes on the website of the developers: What's new? - as you can see, the network has been worked on a regular basis and each release note is multiple pages long - developers are dedicated to making this a success and this is their testament.
Whitepaper 
Proof-of-Diversity (PoD) consensus mechanism requires active participation in the form of time and verifier behavior in the blockchain to be allowed to exert a certain influence on the system as a whole. The Proof-of-Diversity blockchain uses verification cycles to establish the authoritative form of the blockchain. The basic concept of proof-of-diversity is simple. Verifiers take turns producing blocks in a circular order. Some simple rules ensure that verifiers are neither added to nor removed from that circular order too quickly. In order to produce a believable forgery of the blockchain for any meaningful amount of time, an attacker would need to obtain more than half of the private keys of verifiers currently working on the blockchain. The design and technology are simple and clearly explained in NYZO whitepaper. This document was created in the very beginning and it might not cover all aspects as it should, the release notes make up for this.
Still too lazy and didn't read NYZO whitepaper? Relax, and listen to the soothing audio version.
Verifier 
Mesh (cycle) participants are called verifiers. Verifiers are in charge of verifying transactions and producing blocks. In exchange for securing the network, verifiers collect transaction fees which are distributed fairly among all of them. Each verifier gets a chance to verify one block in one mesh cycle. NYZO don't need mining equipment and large amounts of processing power like others, only unique IP address and always-on Linux VPS is required.
Sentinel 
The purpose of the NYZO Sentinel is to provide improved stability of the cycle by producing blocks for in-cycle verifiers that are unable to produce blocks due to temporary hardware and network issues. The Sentinel should not be run on an instance that is running the verifier. The NYZO sentinel is a separate version of the nyzoVerifier designed to protect your in-cycle verifiers. Its job is to constantly check up on your verifiers. If one of them is unresponsive, the sentinel will initiate communication on behalf of the verifier, this all to ensure future cycle inclusion.
The Mesh (cycle) 
is simply a network of computers known as verifiers all running NYZO and communicating information to each other. The Mesh (cycle) is a central point of PoD system. For securing the Mesh these computers are given a 10% reward of transaction fees for each block they secure.
Check your NYZO verifier status, search for your nickname or IP
Newcomers can sometimes get confused with how Nyzo verifier lifecycle works in practice or how to join the cycle.
Block files 
One part of the consensus algorithm is the block consolidation process which ensures that a small machine such as a Rock64 Pro or a beefy Raspberry Pi can run a NYZO verifier with little storage space. 1000 blocks are consolidated into 500 Kb of storage space. Very efficient.
51% attack resistance and energy efficiency 
NYZO has a properly designed economic model that relies on time. Therefore, the cost for 51% attacks (relative to market cap) is huge, there is ongoing incentive to participate in the network, and attacks based on computing power (PoW) or ownership of token (PoS) aren't feasible. NYZO uses only a tiny fraction of Bitcoin’s resources while performing the same tasks. 58 000 000 000 kWh - 58 TWh : current BTC power cons. per year vs 36500 kWh - 0.0000365 TWh : current NYZO power cons. per year = 1,589,041 times more efficient and 51% attack resistant.
Roadmap 
NYZO developers have been asked many times for a roadmap. The roadmap is to keep making the code more stable, more robust, and more efficient.
Nyzo development: 15 months of hard work (and beyond)
Scalability 
NYZO doesn’t require any Layer 2 scaling solutions and is able to handle high transaction volumes per second which is only dependent on the performance of the verifiers in the mesh. The block time is 7 seconds and block size is 28 Kb.
Micropay is a lightweight way of using NYZO that shifts as much burden as possible to the person receiving the payment to make it as easy as possible for someone to send small payments. Next step is an API server for Micropay.
Useful guides and articles 
2k verifiers/nodes are in the cycle and 24k verifiers are patiently waiting to join the mesh/cycle. The following video tutorials will explain in detail how to set up your own NYZO mesh verifier node. For more information about setting up please visit Nyzo DISCORD.
VIDEO TUTORIAL - How to setup a NYZO verifier and sentinel on a VPS - video tutorial from Refortuna Analytics
VIDEO TUTORIAL - How to set up a Nyzo Verifier on Hetzner - from community website Nyzo.io
Nyzo review and guide how to set up verifier - very detailed review and guide by MyAltcoins.info
Nyzo - Time and diversity as a currency (+ 4 translations here) This article goes into detail about the consensus algorithm and its benefits, it sketches a hypothetical attack scenario and the cost of an attack at this point in time (while the market cap is still low).
Arguments against early entrants This article goes into detail about the early stages of the project, what has happened, how certain events have unfolded and the diversity of the project, it creates a parallel between Bitcoin and NYZO to cover an important aspect of the network in detail.
Time An article going deeper into the time aspect of the network, written by a community member
Ethereum An article comparing NYZO’s consensus algorithm to the development state of Ethereum, written by the same user as the article above.
Bitcoin Yet again an article comparing NYZO, this time with Bitcoin.
Proof of Diversity - A novel solution for limitless blockchain scalability | Micky.com.au
Thoughts on Tor and Nyzo
Developer fund 
The initial developer fund plan can be found here, this has been followed up and the details have changed. The developers effectively own 0.6% of the total supply. So far around 11 million has been “mined” and the remainder is spendable by the network through governed voting, with a minimum amount of votes required for NYZO to be released (51% of the network needs to agree).
IMPORTANT LINKS: 
Official website
Nyzo.net
Nyzo.today
Nyzo.io
Nyzo mobile wallet for Android phones on Google Play - Multilingual support (EN, DE, CN, ES, FR, RU, NL, HR) - developed by ThreeDots Technologies
Nyzo key tool and Web wallet
Nyzo Space - Paper wallet - developed by Angainor Dev
Nyzo DISCORD - There are currently 1600 active members and developers in the discord group with multiple joining every day. Most of the community communicates here. Here is where you’re guaranteed to have a one-on-one with the developers.
GitHub
New Community Forum website (You can get here lots of useful information. If you are ready to build for Nyzo and get paid, please read this article... Nyzo and its protocol which facilitates building)
Chinese Community website NYZO社区
Nyzo Twitter
Nyzo Gang Twitter
Facebook
Telegram
Instagram
Tumblr
Reddit
Bitcointalk
Weibo
QQ: 1007477423
WeChat: Nyzo
Zedge
NYZO wallpapers for desktop and mobile devices
Trading: 
qTrade
BILAXY
HOTBIT
QBTC
Citex
BiHodl

https://preview.redd.it/brh7hm2n6m241.png?width=2560&format=png&auto=webp&s=8d8b45235fcc34200bcad5603249ae49a89c2612
submitted by Mobilenewsflash to Nyzo [link] [comments]

Raspberry Pi 16 versus 32 cluster, whats the benefits with more?

Hey guys! For our school we are currently getting our grants for our project, and I was going to do a Raspberry Pi cluster server. I have already done research on this, so I know that is REALLY not going to be effective, but we want to learn more about super computing. But, I have a huge question. Would there be a huge difference between a 16 cluster and a 32 cluster? Also what kind of programs could I run on this said cluster? Thank you! Also I will be posting pictures, because I think buying 600 dollars worth of Raspberry Pi 2's should be awesome!
submitted by Zvight to raspberry_pi [link] [comments]

Your Guide to NYZO

Your Guide to NYZO
NYZO is the highly efficient Proof-of-Diversity (PoD) blockchain for everyday spending.
NYZO has been developed from the ground up, it is an open-source initiative and isn't a copy of any existing blockchain project.
The network has been running for more then one year now and the source code can be found on GitHub. The NYZO codebase is going to start acting as an API server. This will be run-mode dependent, just like the various web server functions that are available now. It will interact with the mesh on one side and whatever it needs to interact with on the other side.
Developers update NYZO all the time with fixes and performance and stability improvements. Every update which has been created for the network so far has been accompanied by a release note, a detailed document detailing every change to the network to make it better.
We can find these release notes on the website of the developers: What's new? - as you can see, the network has been worked on on a regular basis and each release note is multiple pages long - developers are dedicated to making this a success and this is their testament.
Whitepaper 
Proof-of-Diversity (PoD) consensus mechanism requires active participation in the form of time and verifier behaviour in the blockchain to be allowed to exert a certain influence on the system as a whole. The Proof-of-Diversity blockchain uses verification cycles to establish the authoritative form of the blockchain. The basic concept of proof-of-diversity is simple. Verifiers take turns producing blocks in a circular order. Some simple rules ensure that verifiers are neither added to nor removed from that circular order too quickly. In order to produce a believable forgery of the blockchain for any meaningful amount of time, an attacker would need to obtain more than half of the private keys of verifiers currently working on the blockchain. The design and technology are simple and clearly explained in NYZO whitepaper. This document was created in the very beginning and it might not cover all aspects as it should, the release notes make up for this.
Still too lazy and didn't read NYZO whitepaper? Relax, and listen to the soothing audio version.
Verifier 
Mesh (cycle) participants are called verifiers. Verifiers are in charge of verifying transactions and producing blocks. In exchange for securing the network, verifiers collect transaction fees which are distributed fairly among all of them. Each verifier gets a chance to verify one block in one mesh cycle. NYZO don't need mining equipment and large amounts of processing power like others, only unique IP address and always on Linux VPS is required.
Sentinel 
The purpose of the NYZO Sentinel is to provide improve stability of the cycle by producing blocks for in-cycle verifiers that are unable to produce blocks due to temporary hardware and network issues. The Sentinel should not be run on an instance that is running the verifier. The NYZO sentinel is a seperate version of the nyzoVerifier designed to protect your in-cycle verifiers. Its job is to constantly check up on your verifiers. If one of them is unresponsive, the sentinel will initiate communication on behalf of the verifier, this all to ensure future cycle inclusion.
The Mesh (cycle) 
is simply a network of computers known as verifiers all running NYZO and communicating information to each other. The Mesh (cycle) is a central point of PoD system. For securing the Mesh these computers are given 10% reward of transaction fees for each block they secure.
Check your NYZO verifier status, search for your nickname or IP
Newcomers can sometimes get confused with how Nyzo verifier lifecycle works in practice or how to join the cycle.
Block files 
One part of the consensus algorithm is the block consolidation process which ensures that a small machine such as a Rock64 Pro or a beefy Raspberry Pi can run a NYZO verifier with little storage space. 1000 blocks are consolidated into 500 Kb of storage space. Very efficient.
51% attack resistance and energy efficiency 
NYZO has a properly designed economic model that relies on time. Therefore, the cost for 51% attacks (relative to market cap) is huge, there is ongoing incentive to participate in the network, and attacks based on computing power (PoW) or ownership of token (PoS) aren't feasible. NYZO uses only a tiny fraction of Bitcoin’s resources while performing the same tasks. 58 000 000 000 kwH - 58 TWh : current BTC power cons. per year vs 36500 kwH - 0.0000365 TWh : current NYZO power cons. per year = 1,589,041 times more efficient and 51% attack resistant.
Roadmap 
NYZO developers have been asked many times for a roadmap. The roadmap is to keep making the code more stable, more robust, and more efficient.
Nyzo development: 15 months of hard work (and beyond)
Scalability 
NYZO doesn’t require any Layer 2 scaling solutions and is able to handle high transaction volumes per second which is only dependent on the performance of the verifiers in the mesh. The block time is 7 seconds and block size is 28 Kb.
Micropay is a lightweight way of using NYZO that shifts as much burden as possible to the person receiving the payment to make it as easy as possible for someone to send small payments. Next step is an API server for Micropay.
Useful guides and articles 
2k verifiers/nodes are in the cycle and 24k verifiers are patiently waiting to join the mesh/cycle. Following video tutorials will explain in detail how to set up your own NYZO mesh verifier node. For more information about set up visit Nyzo DISCORD.
VIDEO TUTORIAL - How to setup a NYZO verifier and sentinel on a VPS - video tutorial from Refortuna Analytics
VIDEO TUTORIAL - How to set up a Nyzo Verifier on Hetzner - from community website Nyzo.io
Nyzo review and guide how to set up verifier - very detailed review and guide by MyAltcoins.info
Nyzo - Time and diversity as a currency (+ 4 translations here) This article goes into detail about the consensus algorithm and its benefits, it sketches a hypothetical attack scenario and the cost of an attack at this point in time (while the market cap is still low).
Arguments against early entrants This article goes into detail about the early stages of the project, what has happened, how certain events have unfolded and the diversity of the project, it creates a parallel between Bitcoin and NYZO to cover an important aspect of the network in detail.
Time An article going deeper into the time aspect of the network, written by a community member
Ethereum An article comparing NYZO’s consensus algorithm to the development state of Ethereum, written by the same user as the article above.
Bitcoin Yet again an article comparing NYZO, this time with Bitcoin.
Proof of Diversity - A novel solution for limitless blockchain scalability | Micky.com.au
Thoughts on Tor and Nyzo
Developer fund 
The initial developer fund plan can be found here, this has been followed up and the details have changed. The developers effectively own 0.6% of the total supply. So far around 11 million has been “mined” and the remainder is spendable by the network through governed voting, with a minimum amount of votes required for NYZO to be released (51% of the network needs to agree).
IMPORTANT LINKS: 
Official website
Nyzo mobile wallet for Android phones on Google Play - Multilingual support (EN, DE, CN, ES, FR, RU, NL, HR) - developed by ThreeDots Technologies
Nyzo key tool and Web wallet
Nyzo Space - Paper wallet - developed by Angainor Dev
Nyzo DISCORD - There are currently 1600 active members and developers in the discord group with multiple joining every day. Most of the community communicates here. Here is where you’re guaranteed to have a one-on-one with the developers.
GitHub
New Community Forum website (You can get here lots of useful information. If you are ready to build for Nyzo and get paid, please read this article... Nyzo and its protocol which facilitates building)
Chinese Community website NYZO社区
Nyzo Twitter
Nyzo Gang Twitter
Facebook
Telegram
Instagram
Tumblr
Reddit
Bitcointalk
Weibo
QQ: 1007477423
Zedge
NYZO wallpapers for desktop and mobile devices
Trading: 
qTrade
BILAXY
Hotbit
QBTC
Citex
BiHodl


https://preview.redd.it/5ep6vlsj3l341.png?width=2560&format=png&auto=webp&s=40ef27f1c38bb3d4c542cfdfc58faa054ad7cc0b
submitted by Mobilenewsflash to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

A 14-year-old's experience with Bitcoin

First-time poster here, don’t bully me, apologies for the potentially atrocious formatting :) TL;DR at the end
So in the wake of Bitcoin’s explosive rise in value and media attention, I’ve been encouraged by others to share my experience over the past few years as a miner. Here's my story (it's kinda long, you've been warned)

Humble Beginnings

It all started almost three years ago in the beginning of 2015 when Bitcoin flew under my radar. Looking into it, I admittedly wasn’t drawn in because of the decentralisation or the anonymous payments, I was hooked on the idea that anyone could get their hands on some just by running a program and leaving it to do its own thing. I know, how shallow of me. But the idea of making even a bit of money without ‘any work’ was convincing enough for 11-year-old me to do more digging into the matter.
To my disappointment, I soon found out that the era of mining Bitcoins with a PC’s CPU or GPU was long obsolete and instead it was all ASICs at that point.
So that summer, for my twelfth birthday, I got a little ASIC machine for €60, an Antminer U3. This little thing took up less space than a graphics card but could mine at 60 GH/s. Because, at the time, I didn’t have a controller device that could be kept up and running all day long so it could run the program that mined Bitcoin using the U3, I went ahead and got a Raspberry Pi. After setting up the Pi and installing all the necessary stuff (took an awfully long time), I connected it to AntPool and plugged the U3 in. Two days past and the mining pool sent the first Bitcoin I ever received to my wallet (I was using Blockchain.info). It was just 30 cents worth of BTC but I felt a bit of a rush because I was earning a bit of money through this completely new thing and the idea of that was thrilling.
Let’s back up for a second. I just used the term ‘earning’ as if I was profiting, and naive me 2 years ago was no different. In reality, I was at first oblivious to the fact that I was most likely LOSING money overall because of how much energy that little sucker was taking in. But, I was comforted thinking that using that machine was just a practical way of learning about this modern currency and that the loss of several cents’ worth of energy was acceptable in the name of education and learning.
Fast forward ten months to the wonderful summer of 2016. I had recently turned 13 and the Antminer U3 had been running on and off throughout. Various pauses and breaks in mining would be observed, as I had to manually get everything up and running after frequent breaks in the Internet connection. You’d expect my newly-turned-teenage brain to lose interest in Bitcoin as it does with many other gimmicks, but – even surprising myself – I miraculously didn’t. Good thing I maintained interest thinking about it now, not so good at the time for my parents. Why do I say this? I felt like it was time to get a little upgrade in my hardware.

Getting an upgrade

Days passed with me comparing every ASIC miner I could at that price point. It was then I set my eyes upon the Antminer S7 (same folks who did my U3, nice). I had put it up against a plethora of other miners and I figured the S7 was my best bet; the thing costs only about 10 times that of my U3 but could run at 4.73 TH/s, almost 80 times as powerful. The only problem being its power consumption was at 1300 watts, which would put a massive dent in the electricity bill and eliminate any profit I would make. Fortunately, I had a secret weapon up my sleeve – or rather my mum did. She had rented out an office outside our apartment where she would keep files and paperwork. The office’s electricity bill was a flat rate as far as I’m aware and it ended up being my saving grace because it virtually got rid of the “oh no I’m actually going to be losing money because of how much electricity I’m eating up” factor, making this whole hardware upgrade viable.
After convincing my parents, they finally agreed to shell out the requested amount, with the initial investment being paid back with time. I went to a local Bitcoin vendor and purchased 1 BTC for about $665 in cash (sigh yes, I know. $665 dollars). Shortly after, I used about 0.9 BTC to purchase the Antminer S7 and a 1600W power supply for a grand total of $600. The products would be made and shipped from China so I was definitely in for a wait.
A month passes and the package arrives at last. I connected all the wires from the power supply into the S7 and – with great anticipation – I plugged it into the wall to start its first ever run. And what do you know? An extremely loud and high-pitched whirring sound blasted out from the fans on both the power supply as well as the S7. After killing the thing, I questioned my choices. I couldn’t dare put that thing anywhere near my mum’s office in the event it drive everyone in the building absolutely nuts. I was at a loss. However, I soon recovered from my temporarily debilitated state and got working on a solution.
The first idea that came to my mind: change the fans. The stocks fans were by Evercool and spun at around 3000 RPM. The power supply used a small, robust fan that looked like a cube that must’ve spun at extremely high speeds judging by how high the sound it produced was. I got my parents to give me some more funding so I could acquire the replacement fans and I did. Bust. After installation and testing, none of the fans would work. I managed to configure the S7 to connect to my Antpool account and the machine would manage mining for several minutes running at peak performance but ultimately be automatically cut off because of how hot the machine was getting (I’m talking about 80 degrees Celsius kinda hot in that thing). The fans got refunded and I was back to the drawing board.
After combing through some forum posts and videos, I came across this video and a forum post in which people have their mining rigs placed inside a ventilated, muffled cabinet. Undertaking a project like this would be time-consuming and risky but I had no better ideas so I decided to go through with the idea anyway.
Firstly, I sought out a cabinet with suitable dimensions. I managed to get just what I needed at a second-hand IKEA shop. Great. Secondly, I went ahead and acquired some sound-absorbing acoustic foam from a local provider. Fantastic. Finally I had to get a ventilation system going within the cabinet, otherwise, all the hot air would roast the machine alive in there in a bloody mess. With the help of my dad, we found a pair cabinet fans on the Internet that were close to silent but could circulate the air well enough.
Eventually, all the materials came and, with the help of my parents, put everything together. The process took quite long time and we had a couple hiccups along the way, but we got it done and it came out pretty nice.
The moment of truth came and, to my relief, it ran so much quieter than without the cabinet. It was nowhere near silent but it reduced the noise a great deal. Soon after, I got the thing into the office and set everything up from there. Unfortunately, I was forced to underclock it because you could still hear the machine’s whining from outside the thin office door. Gunning the hashrate down about 25% to 3.7TH/s, I could lower the fan speed without risking the machine burning up. Sure, I wasn’t getting the full potential of the machine but I didn’t complain because electricity was not an issue there and it was still a whole lot better than my U3. With it up and running, I could leave it there, periodically checking to see if it was mining on Antpool.

The aftermath

In the months that followed, I was getting a solid $2.5 worth of BTC on daily basis. Half a year later, May of 2017, I had accumulated a satisfactory $600. I thought, “At this rate, I’d be able to pay my parents’ investment back in a few months” (the total investment came close to $900). Bitcoin had risen to over $1500 so I was already over the moon at that point because of how well everything was going. Little did I know…
I hit 0.5 BTC midway through September this year. The price of BTC had dropped after a sudden rise to $5000, but I couldn’t have asked for more. Although I possessed only half the amount of BTC I paid for the machine, its value was over twice that of the initial investment. I thought BTC would level off at around $4000 but nope.
In the month of October, the price skyrocketed. Since September, I had only mined 0.017 BTC but the value was already over $3000. It was just a matter of selling it, but I decided to hodl. Good thing I did.
As of November 5, I have approximately 0.52 BTC mined in total from my S7, valued at $4000. If I were to sell it right now, I’d have a profit of over $3100. And as for my miner, it’s churning out 0.0006 BTC daily, sounds like nothing but it’s still the equivalent of $5 today and I couldn’t be happier, at least with the miner and Bitcoin.
You remember that $665 for 1 BTC that I mentioned earlier? In hindsight, it would’ve been such a better idea to just keep that one Bitcoin and not do anything with it until today (in the interest of making much more money), as I’d theoretically have upwards of $7000. The idea of that still haunts me sometimes if I dwell on it too long but knowing that I’m in possession of an already hefty amount, the pain of it had numbed slightly. It’s not all doom and gloom for me from the exponential increase in Bitcoin’s value, however. Those first $0.3 payments from my humble little U3 all those years ago now are now the equivalent of over $6 today!
Bitcoin and everything it encompasses has been and still is a journey of discovery and an adventure. Looking back, starting with a modest €60 Antminer U3 to having a sum of Bitcoin equivalent to two extremely high-end gaming rigs (first thing I could think of as a comparison, sorry) has been something I can’t really describe. Through the course of the past few years, I’ve learned more about technology, I’ve unexpectedly gotten insight into economics and business and – of course – I’ve made a lot of money (if I decide to stop hodling that is).
Also, props to my parents for keeping an open mind throughout, I know some parents would be horrified at their kids being involved in something that has been used in some less-than-savoury ways and it's great knowing mine have been supportive all the way.
TL;DR got into Bitcoin mining 3 years ago at age 11 with an Antminer U3 that ran at 60 GH/s, got an Antminer S7 (4.73TH/s) and built a sound-muffling, ventilated cabinet for it. Am sat here today with $3000 profit if I decide to sell right now.
submitted by xx_riptide_xx to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Anyone feel like the Orange Pi's are faster/more reliable than the Raspberry Pi?

So I've been using the Orange Pi's for a while now (I have a bunch of Orange Pi Zero's, but I also have an Orange Pi Zero Plus and an Orange Pi PC2). I'm running Armbian on all of them, and I've been using them for some compute-intensive tasks (no, not Bitcoin mining). I also have a Raspberry Pi Model B, a Raspberry Pi Model 3B, and a Raspberry Pi Model 3B+. And honestly? It seems like I've had nothing but trouble with the Raspberry Pi Model 3's lately. A couple of examples:
I just haven't had this same level of issues with the Orange Pi's. I set them up with what I need, and they just go. Many of them have been online for over 90 days now (probably the last time I power cycled them) without any issues.
On top of that -- I feel like the Orange Pi's perform better than the Raspberry Pi's do. Good example? Just doing a nice sudo apt full-upgrade. The Orange Pi's zip through that much faster than the Raspberry Pi's do.
Is it just me, or does it seem to anyone else like you get better performance, better reliability, and better value with Orange Pi's?
submitted by mikaey00 to OrangePI [link] [comments]

/r/Bitcoin FAQ - Newcomers please read

Welcome to the /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

You've probably been hearing a lot about Bitcoin recently and are wondering what's the big deal? Most of your questions should be answered by the resources below but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments.
Some great introductions for new users are My first bitcoin, Bitcoin explained and ELI5 Bitcoin. Also, the following videos are a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little about its long term potential:
Also have to give mention to Lopp.net, the Princeton crypto series and James D'Angelo's Bitcoin 101 Blackboard series. Some excellent writing on Bitcoin's value proposition and future can be found at the Satoshi Nakamoto Institute. Bitcoin statistics can be found here, here and here. Developer resources can be found here, here and here. Peer-reviewed research papers can be found here. Potential upcoming protocol improvements here. Scaling resources here. The number of times Bitcoin was declared dead by the media can be found here (LOL!), and of course Satoshi Nakamoto's whitepaper that started it all! :)
Key properties of bitcoin

Where can I buy bitcoins?

Bitcoin.org, BuyBitcoinWorldwide.com and Howtobuybitcoin.io are helpful sites for beginners. You can buy or sell any amount of bitcoin and there are several easy methods to purchase bitcoin with cash, credit card or bank transfer. Some of the more popular resources are below, also, check out the bitcoinity exchange resources for a larger list of options for purchases.
Bank Transfer Credit / Debit card Cash
Gemini Bitstamp LocalBitcoins
Bitstamp Bitit Mycelium LocalTrader
BitFinex Cex.io LibertyX
Cex.io CoinMama WallofCoins
Xapo Spectrocoin BitcoinOTC
Kraken Luno BitQuick
itBit
HitBTC
Bitit
Bisq (decentralized)
Luno
Spectrocoin
Here is a listing of local ATMs. If you would like your paycheck automatically converted to bitcoin use Bitwage.
Note: Bitcoins are valued at whatever market price people are willing to pay for them in balancing act of supply vs demand. Unlike traditional markets, bitcoin markets operate 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Preev is a useful site that that shows how much various denominations of bitcoin are worth in different currencies. Alternatively you can just Google "1 bitcoin in (your local currency)".

Securing your bitcoins

With bitcoin you can "Be your own bank" and personally secure your bitcoins OR you can use third party companies aka "Bitcoin banks" which will hold the bitcoins for you.
Android iOs Desktop
Samouari BreadWallet Electrum
Another interesting use case for physical storage/transfer is the Opendime. Opendime is a small USB stick that allows you to spend Bitcoin by physically passing it along so it's anonymous and tangible like cash.
Note: For increased security, use Two Factor Authentication (2FA) everywhere it is offered, including email!
2FA requires a second confirmation code to access your account, usually from a text message or app, making it much harder for thieves to gain access. Google Authenticator and Authy are the two most popular 2FA services, download links are below. Make sure you create backups of your 2FA codes.
Google Auth Authy
Android Android
iOS iOS

Where can I spend bitcoins?

Check out spendabit or bitcoin directory for some good options, some of the more commons ones are listed below.
Store Product
Gyft Gift cards for hundreds of retailers including Amazon, Target, Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods, CVS, Lowes, Home Depot, iTunes, Best Buy, Sears, Kohls, eBay, GameStop, etc.
Steam, HumbleBundle, Games Planet, itch.io, g2g and kinguin For when you need to get your game on
Microsoft Xbox games, phone apps and software
Spendabit, Overstock, The Bitcoin Directory and BazaarBay Retail shopping with millions of results
ShakePay Generate one time use Visa cards in seconds
NewEgg and Dell For all your electronics needs
Bitwa.la, Coinbills, Piixpay, Bitbill.eu, Bylls, Coins.ph, Bitrefill, LivingRoomofSatoshi, Hyphen.to, Coinsfer, More #1, #2 Bill payment
Menufy, Takeaway, Thuisbezorgd NL, Pizza For Coins Takeout delivered to your door!
Expedia, Cheapair, Lot, Destinia, BTCTrip, Abitsky, SkyTours, Fluege the Travel category on Gyft and 9flats For when you need to get away
BitHost VPS service
Cryptostorm, Mullvad, and PIA VPN services
Namecheap, Porkbun For new domain name registration
Stampnik Discounted USPS Priority, Express, First-Class mail postage
Reddit Gold Premium membership which can be gifted to others
Coinmap and AirBitz are helpful to find local businesses accepting bitcoins. A good resource for UK residents is at wheretospendbitcoins.co.uk.
There are also lots of charities which accept bitcoin donations, such as Wikipedia, United Way, ACLU and the EFF. You can find a longer list here.

Merchant Resources

There are several benefits to accepting bitcoin as a payment option if you are a merchant;
If you are interested in accepting bitcoin as a payment method, there are several options available;

Can I mine bitcoin?

Mining bitcoins can be a fun learning experience, but be aware that you will most likely operate at a loss. Newcomers are often advised to stay away from mining unless they are only interested in it as a hobby similar to folding at home. If you want to learn more about mining you can read more here. Still have mining questions? The crew at /BitcoinMining would be happy to help you out.
If you want to contribute to the bitcoin network by hosting the blockchain and propagating transactions you can run a full node using this setup guide. Bitseed is an easy option for getting set up. You can view the global node distribution here.

Earning bitcoins

Just like any other form of money, you can also earn bitcoins by being paid to do a job.
Site Description
WorkingForBitcoins, Bitwage, XBTfreelancer, Cryptogrind, Bitlancerr, Coinality, Bitgigs, /Jobs4Bitcoins, Rein Project Freelancing
OpenBazaar, Purse.io, Bitify, /Bitmarket, 21 Market Marketplaces
Streamium.io, XOtika.tv NSFW, /GirlsGoneBitcoin NSFW Video Streaming
Bitasker, BitforTip Tasks
Supload.com, SatoshiBox, JoyStream, File Army File/Image Sharing
CoinAd, A-ads, Coinzilla.io Advertising
You can also earn bitcoins by participating as a market maker on JoinMarket by allowing users to perform CoinJoin transactions with your bitcoins for a small fee (requires you to already have some bitcoins)

Bitcoin Projects

The following is a short list of ongoing projects that might be worth taking a look at if you are interested in current development in the bitcoin space.
Project Description
Lightning Network, Amiko Pay, and Strawpay Payment channels for network scaling
Blockstream, Rootstock and Drivechain Sidechains
21, Inc. Open source library for the machine payable web
ShapeShift.io Trade between bitcoins and altcoins easily
Open Transactions, Counterparty, Omni, Open Assets, Symbiont and Chain Financial asset platforms
Hivemind and Augur Prediction markets
Mediachain Decentralized media library
Tierion and Factom Records & Titles on the blockchain
BitMarkets, DropZone, Beaver and Open Bazaar Decentralized markets
Samourai and Dark Wallet - abandoned Privacy-enhancing wallets
JoinMarket CoinJoin implementation (Increase privacy and/or Earn interest on bitcoin holdings)
Coinffeine and Bisq Decentralized bitcoin exchanges
Keybase and Bitrated Identity & Reputation management
Telehash Mesh networking
JoyStream BitTorrent client with paid seeding
MORPHiS Decentralized, encrypted internet
Storj and Sia Decentralized file storage
Streamium Pay in real time for on-demand services
Abra Global P2P money transmitter network
bitSIM PIN secure hardware token between SIM & Phone
Identifi Decentralized address book w/ ratings system
BitGo Multisig bitcoin API
Bitcore Open source Bitcoin javascript library
Insight Open source blockchain API
Leet Kill your friends and take their money ;)

Bitcoin Units

One Bitcoin is quite large (hundreds of £/$/€) so people often deal in smaller units. The most common subunits are listed below:
Unit Symbol Value Info
millibitcoin mBTC 1,000 per bitcoin SI unit for milli i.e. millilitre (mL) or millimetre (mm)
microbitcoin μBTC 1,000,000 per bitcoin SI unit for micro i.e microlitre (μL) or micrometre (μm)
bit bit 1,000,000 per bitcoin Colloquial "slang" term for microbitcoin
satoshi sat 100,000,000 per bitcoin Smallest unit in bitcoin, named after the inventor
For example, assuming an arbitrary exchange rate of $10000 for one Bitcoin, a $10 meal would equal:
For more information check out the Bitcoin units wiki.
Still have questions? Feel free to ask in the comments below or stick around for our weekly Mentor Monday thread. If you decide to post a question in /Bitcoin, please use the search bar to see if it has been answered before, and remember to follow the community rules outlined on the sidebar to receive a better response. The mods are busy helping manage our community so please do not message them unless you notice problems with the functionality of the subreddit. A complete list of bitcoin related subreddits can be found here
Note: This is a community created FAQ. If you notice anything missing from the FAQ or that requires clarification you can edit it here and it will be included in the next revision pending approval.
Welcome to the Bitcoin community and the new decentralized economy!
submitted by BinaryResult to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Here's a list of 520+ free online programming/CS courses (MOOCs) with feedback(i.e. exams/homeworks/assignments) that you can start this month (October 2016)

Unfortunately I couldn't fit all the courses here because of Reddit's 40,000 character limit. So I removed older self-paced courses from the list. These courses are always open for registration.
They can be found here:
~300 Self Paced Programming and Computer Science courses
I have also started categorizing the courses listed here by the programming language they are taught in. You can find the list here:
~250 MOOCs categorized by Programming Language
This is not the complete list of MOOCs starting in October 2016, just the ones relevant to this community. The complete list of courses starting in October 2016 can be found over at Class Central (1800+ courses). I maintain a much bigger list of these courses over at Class Central
Get this list every month via email : Subscribe
NOTE: Unfortunately Coursera has converted many of its courses to 'Premium Grading'. Which basically means that you need to pay if you want to access graded assignments :(. You can also apply for Financial Aid - https://learner.coursera.help/hc/en-us/articles/209819033-Apply-for-Financial-Aid
BEGINNER(28)
Course Name Start Date Length (in weeks) Rating
AP® Computer Science Principles via edX Self paced NA NA
Introduction to CSS3 via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 4.6★ (7)
[NEW] Introduction to Web Development via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Internet History, Technology, and Security via Coursera 3rd Oct 10 4.6★ (28)
Data to Insight: an Introduction to Data Analysis via FutureLearn 3rd Oct 8 4★ (2)
Programming Foundations with JavaScript, HTML and CSS via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.8★ (9)
Introduction to Cyber Security via FutureLearn 3rd Oct 8 4.2★ (18)
Introduction to Programming with Java, Part 1: Starting to Code with Java via edX 4th Oct NA 3★ (2)
How To Create a Website in a Weekend! (Project-Centered Course) via Coursera 10th Oct 3 5★ (1)
Ruby on Rails: An Introduction via Coursera 10th Oct 3 3.1★ (48)
Learn to Code for Data Analysis via FutureLearn 10th Oct 4 3★ (1)
Build a Modern Computer from First Principles: From Nand to Tetris (Project-Centered Course) via Coursera 10th Oct 6 4.8★ (12)
Code Yourself! An Introduction to Programming via Coursera 10th Oct 5 4.3★ (6)
CODAPPS: Coding mobile apps for entrepreneurs via Coursera 10th Oct 8 5★ (1)
[NEW] Python Programming: A Concise Introduction via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
HTML, CSS, and Javascript for Web Developers via Coursera 10th Oct 5 5★ (4)
HTML, CSS and JavaScript via Coursera 10th Oct 3 4.1★ (13)
Introduction to HTML5 via Coursera 10th Oct 3 4.1★ (30)
Introduction to the Internet of Things and Embedded Systems via Coursera 10th Oct 4 3.7★ (6)
An Introduction to Interactive Programming in Python (Part 2) via Coursera 17th Oct 4 4.8★ (40)
Usable Security via Coursera 17th Oct 7 2.9★ (8)
Introduction to Programming with MATLAB via Coursera 17th Oct 9 4.9★ (141)
An Introduction to Interactive Programming in Python (Part 1) via Coursera 17th Oct 5 4.9★ (2816)
Creative Programming for Digital Media & Mobile Apps via Coursera 24th Oct NA 4★ (10)
[NEW] AP Computer Science A: Java Programming Data Structures and Loops via edX 24th Oct NA NA
Learn to Program: The Fundamentals via Coursera 24th Oct 10 4.8★ (81)
Introduction à la programmation orientée objet (en Java) via Coursera 24th Oct 7 5★ (1)
Begin Programming: Build Your First Mobile Game via FutureLearn 31st Oct 7 3.9★ (7)
INTERMEDIATE(154)
Course Name Start Date Length (in weeks) Rating
M233: Getting Started with Spark and MongoDB via MongoDB University Self paced NA NA
Android Basics: Data Storage via Udacity Self paced NA NA
[NEW] Essential Design Principles for Tableau via Coursera 1st Oct NA NA
Software Defined Networking via Coursera 1st Oct NA 4★ (5)
Client Needs and Software Requirements via Coursera 1st Oct 4 4.3★ (6)
Client Needs and Software Requirements via Coursera 1st Oct 4 4.3★ (6)
Agile Planning for Software Products via Coursera 1st Oct 4 3★ (2)
VLSI CAD Part I: Logic via Coursera 1st Oct 10 5★ (3)
Software Processes and Agile Practices via Coursera 1st Oct 4 4.3★ (9)
Introduction to Software Product Management via Coursera 1st Oct 2 4.2★ (10)
Reviews & Metrics for Software Improvements via Coursera 1st Oct 4 NA
Discrete Optimization via Coursera 2nd Oct 9 4.3★ (11)
Internet Emerging Technologies via Coursera 3rd Oct 3 3★ (2)
Java Programming: Arrays, Lists, and Structured Data via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 4.3★ (3)
Multiplatform Mobile App Development with Web Technologies via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 5★ (1)
Responsive Web Design via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.3★ (10)
Big Data Integration and Processing via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Robotic Vision via EdCast 3rd Oct 9 4.8★ (4)
Algorithms on Strings via Coursera 3rd Oct NA 3★ (1)
Introduction To Swift Programming via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 1.2★ (5)
Fundamentals of Visualization with Tableau via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Mastering the Software Engineering Interview via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 5★ (1)
Cloud Computing Applications, Part 1: Cloud Systems and Infrastructure via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 3.4★ (7)
Data Management and Visualization via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 2.4★ (5)
Cryptography via Coursera 3rd Oct 7 4.2★ (6)
Managing Data Analysis via Coursera 3rd Oct 1 1.8★ (6)
iOS App Development Basics via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 4★ (2)
Data Analysis Tools via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3★ (3)
Principles of Machine Learning via edX 3rd Oct NA NA
Testing with Agile via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Internet of Things: How did we get here? via Coursera 3rd Oct 2 2★ (5)
Cloud Computing Concepts: Part 2 via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 4.8★ (4)
Cybersecurity and Mobility via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Data Science in Real Life via Coursera 3rd Oct 1 3★ (8)
Introduction to Meteor.js Development via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 5★ (3)
[NEW] The R Programming Environment via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Big Data: Mathematical Modelling via FutureLearn 3rd Oct 2 NA
Process Mining: Data science in Action via Coursera 3rd Oct 6 4.3★ (12)
[NEW] Programming Languages, Part C via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Big Data, Cloud Computing, & CDN Emerging Technologies via Coursera 3rd Oct 3 3.3★ (4)
Wireless Communication Emerging Technologies via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 3.7★ (3)
Algorithms, Part I via Coursera 3rd Oct 6 4.4★ (37)
Running Product Design Sprints via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 NA
Internet of Things & Augmented Reality Emerging Technologies via Coursera 3rd Oct 2 2.5★ (2)
R Programming via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 2.7★ (210)
The Data Scientist’s Toolbox via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.2★ (141)
Getting and Cleaning Data via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.4★ (47)
Practical Machine Learning via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.4★ (20)
Exploratory Data Analysis via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.8★ (32)
Cybersecurity and the X-Factor via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Regression Models via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 2.6★ (27)
Statistical Inference via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 2.7★ (26)
Dealing With Missing Data via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Reproducible Research via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.7★ (22)
Machine Learning via Coursera 3rd Oct 11 4.8★ (204)
Internet of Things: Setting Up Your DragonBoard™ Development Platform via Coursera 3rd Oct 10 3★ (3)
Introduction to Big Data via Coursera 3rd Oct 3 2.6★ (27)
Algorithms: Design and Analysis, Part 1 via Coursera 3rd Oct 6 4.7★ (52)
Algorithmic Toolbox via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 4.7★ (6)
Cryptography I via Coursera 3rd Oct 7 4.7★ (38)
A Crash Course in Data Science via Coursera 3rd Oct 1 3.3★ (14)
Data Visualization and Communication with Tableau via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 4★ (7)
Java Programming: Solving Problems with Software via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.3★ (8)
Database Management Essentials via Coursera 3rd Oct 7 3.8★ (4)
Hadoop Platform and Application Framework via Coursera 3rd Oct 5 1.9★ (19)
Front-End Web UI Frameworks and Tools via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 4.3★ (6)
Algorithms: Design and Analysis, Part 2 via Coursera 3rd Oct 6 4.8★ (16)
A developer's guide to the Internet of Things (IoT) via Coursera 3rd Oct NA 4★ (1)
Java for Android via Coursera 4th Oct 4 NA
Data Visualization via Coursera 10th Oct 4 3.2★ (15)
Framework for Data Collection and Analysis via Coursera 10th Oct NA 3.5★ (2)
Interactivity with JavaScript via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4.3★ (6)
Responsive Website Basics: Code with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript via Coursera 10th Oct 4 3.9★ (20)
Introduction to Spreadsheets and Models via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4.7★ (3)
Functional Program Design in Scala via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
The Raspberry Pi Platform and Python Programming for the Raspberry Pi via Coursera 10th Oct 4 3.5★ (2)
Biology Meets Programming: Bioinformatics for Beginners via Coursera 10th Oct 4 5★ (5)
Best Practices for iOS User Interface Design via Coursera 10th Oct 4 5★ (1)
Algorithms on Graphs via Coursera 10th Oct NA 4★ (1)
Big Data Modeling and Management Systems via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
Advanced Algorithms and Complexity via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
Java Programming: Principles of Software Design via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4.7★ (3)
Programming Mobile Applications for Android Handheld Systems: Part 2 via Coursera 10th Oct 5 4.5★ (12)
Interfacing with the Arduino via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4★ (4)
Toward the Future of iOS Development with Swift via Coursera 10th Oct 4 NA
Advanced Data Structures in Java via Coursera 10th Oct 5 NA
Interfacing with the Raspberry Pi via Coursera 10th Oct 4 1★ (1)
Web Application Development with JavaScript and MongoDB via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4.2★ (5)
Data Manipulation at Scale: Systems and Algorithms via Coursera 10th Oct 4 2.5★ (4)
Data Structures and Performance via Coursera 10th Oct 5 5★ (3)
Approximation Algorithms Part I via Coursera 10th Oct 5 5★ (2)
Getting Started: Agile Meets Design Thinking via Coursera 10th Oct 5 5★ (1)
Text Retrieval and Search Engines via Coursera 10th Oct 4 3.2★ (5)
Games, Sensors and Media via Coursera 10th Oct 4 NA
Advanced Styling with Responsive Design via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4.7★ (3)
Beginning Game Programming with C# via Coursera 10th Oct 12 3.4★ (14)
Programming Mobile Applications for Android Handheld Systems: Part 1 via Coursera 10th Oct 5 4.1★ (35)
Managing an Agile Team via Coursera 10th Oct NA 2★ (1)
Cybersecurity and the Internet of Things via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
Data Warehouse Concepts, Design, and Data Integration via Coursera 10th Oct 5 5★ (1)
Responsive Website Tutorial and Examples via Coursera 10th Oct 4 5★ (1)
App Design and Development for iOS via Coursera 10th Oct 5 3★ (2)
Foundations of Objective-C App Development via Coursera 10th Oct 4 3★ (2)
Functional Programming Principles in Scala via Coursera 10th Oct 7 4.8★ (45)
Ruby on Rails Web Services and Integration with MongoDB via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4.8★ (4)
Object Oriented Programming in Java via Coursera 10th Oct 6 4.8★ (10)
Build Your First Android App (Project-Centered Course) via Coursera 10th Oct 5 3★ (1)
Managing Big Data with MySQL via Coursera 10th Oct 5 3.8★ (5)
Rails with Active Record and Action Pack via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4★ (1)
Data Structures via Coursera 10th Oct 4 2★ (2)
Single Page Web Applications with AngularJS via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
Software Architecture for the Internet of Things via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
The Arduino Platform and C Programming via Coursera 10th Oct 4 3.3★ (7)
Cloud Computing Concepts, Part 1 via Coursera 10th Oct 5 2.6★ (17)
Server-side Development with NodeJS via Coursera 10th Oct 4 5★ (1)
Mining Massive Datasets via Stanford OpenEdx 11th Oct 7 4.6★ (17)
M101J: MongoDB for Java Developers via MongoDB University 11th Oct 7 4.5★ (15)
M101JS: MongoDB for Node.js Developers via MongoDB University 11th Oct 7 4.4★ (8)
M101N: MongoDB for .NET Developers via MongoDB University 11th Oct NA 4★ (3)
M101P: MongoDB for Developers via MongoDB University 11th Oct 7 4.8★ (8)
M102: MongoDB for DBAs via MongoDB University 11th Oct 7 4.5★ (8)
M202: MongoDB Advanced Deployment and Operations via MongoDB University 11th Oct 7 5★ (4)
Software Security via Coursera 17th Oct 6 4.7★ (20)
Global Warming II: Create Your Own Models in Python via Coursera 17th Oct 5 2★ (1)
Programming Languages, Part A via Coursera 17th Oct NA 4.9★ (16)
Algorithmic Thinking (Part 1) via Coursera 17th Oct 4 4.1★ (13)
C++ For C Programmers, Part B via Coursera 17th Oct NA NA
Interactive Computer Graphics via Coursera 17th Oct 8 3.5★ (2)
[NEW] Advanced R Programming via Coursera 17th Oct NA NA
Principles of Computing (Part 1) via Coursera 17th Oct 5 4.6★ (25)
[NEW] How to Win Coding Competitions: Secrets of Champions via edX 17th Oct NA NA
Front-End JavaScript Frameworks: AngularJS via Coursera 17th Oct 4 3.8★ (4)
Internet of Things: Communication Technologies via Coursera 17th Oct 4 3★ (2)
Algorithmic Thinking (Part 2) via Coursera 17th Oct NA 4.4★ (8)
Introduction to Neurohacking In R via Coursera 17th Oct NA NA
Cloud Networking via Coursera 17th Oct 5 4.3★ (3)
Introduction to Architecting Smart IoT Devices via Coursera 17th Oct NA NA
Principles of Computing (Part 2) via Coursera 17th Oct NA 4.3★ (14)
Programming Languages, Part B via Coursera 17th Oct NA NA
[NEW] Internet of Things for Active Aging via FutureLearn 17th Oct NA NA
[NEW] Cyber Security Economics via edX 19th Oct NA NA
Introduction to Computational Thinking and Data Science via edX 19th Oct 9 4.4★ (20)
Genomic Data Science with Galaxy via Coursera 24th Oct 4 1.8★ (11)
Bioinformatics: Introduction and Methods 生物信息学: 导论与方法 via Coursera 24th Oct 14 NA
Web Application Development: Basic Concepts via Coursera 24th Oct NA NA
Python for Genomic Data Science via Coursera 24th Oct 4 2.4★ (11)
Introduction to Genomic Technologies via Coursera 24th Oct 4 2.7★ (10)
[NEW] Julia Scientific Programming via Coursera 24th Oct NA NA
Introduction to Data Science in Python via Coursera 24th Oct NA NA
Computer Architecture via Coursera 24th Oct 11 4.5★ (4)
Statistics for Genomic Data Science via Coursera 24th Oct 4 2★ (2)
C++ For C Programmers, Part A via Coursera 24th Oct NA 3.2★ (9)
Документы и презентации в LaTeX (Introduction to LaTeX) via Coursera 31st Oct 5 NA
Big Data: Data Visualisation via FutureLearn 31st Oct 2 NA
ADVANCED(42)
Course Name Start Date Length (in weeks) Rating
Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency Technologies via Coursera 1st Oct 7 4.6★ (9)
[NEW] Nature, in Code: Biology in JavaScript via edX 1st Oct NA NA
[NEW] Recommender Systems: Evaluation and Metrics via Coursera 1st Oct NA NA
Nearest Neighbor Collaborative Filtering via Coursera 1st Oct NA NA
Machine Learning: Clustering & Retrieval via Coursera 3rd Oct NA 4.5★ (2)
Big Data Science with the BD2K-LINCS Data Coordination and Integration Center via Coursera 3rd Oct 7 4★ (1)
Text Mining and Analytics via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.7★ (6)
Embedded Hardware and Operating Systems via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
System Validation: Automata and behavioural equivalences via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Machine Learning for Data Analysis via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3★ (3)
Neural Networks for Machine Learning via Coursera 3rd Oct 8 4.5★ (11)
Quantitative Formal Modeling and Worst-Case Performance Analysis via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 4★ (2)
Advanced Linear Models for Data Science 1: Least Squares via Coursera 3rd Oct NA NA
Developing Data Products via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 3.9★ (16)
Cluster Analysis in Data Mining via Coursera 3rd Oct 4 2.6★ (5)
Machine Learning: Regression via Coursera 3rd Oct 6 4.7★ (13)
Introduction to Natural Language Processing via Coursera 3rd Oct NA 3.8★ (6)
Regression Modeling in Practice via Coursera 7th Oct 4 5★ (2)
Parallel programming via Coursera 10th Oct NA 5★ (1)
Pattern Discovery in Data Mining via Coursera 10th Oct 4 2.2★ (19)
Finding Hidden Messages in DNA (Bioinformatics I) via Coursera 10th Oct 4 4.5★ (16)
Graph Analytics for Big Data via Coursera 10th Oct 4 2.4★ (5)
Introduction to Recommender Systems: Non-Personalized and Content-Based via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
Nearest Neighbor Collaborative Filtering via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
Practical Predictive Analytics: Models and Methods via Coursera 10th Oct 4 2.5★ (2)
Hardware Security via Coursera 10th Oct 6 3★ (9)
Approximation Algorithms Part II via Coursera 10th Oct 4 NA
Cloud Computing Applications, Part 2: Big Data and Applications in the Cloud via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
Genomic Data Science and Clustering (Bioinformatics V) via Coursera 10th Oct 2 3.5★ (2)
[NEW] Big Data, Genes, and Medicine via Coursera 10th Oct NA NA
Genome Sequencing (Bioinformatics II) via Coursera 10th Oct 4 5★ (3)
Machine Learning Foundations: A Case Study Approach via Coursera 10th Oct 6 4.2★ (30)
Relational Database Support for Data Warehouses via Coursera 10th Oct 5 2★ (1)
[NEW] Quantum Cryptography via edX 10th Oct NA NA
[NEW] Introduction to OpenStack via edX 12th Oct NA NA
Machine Learning: Classification via Coursera 17th Oct 7 4.8★ (6)
Bioconductor for Genomic Data Science via Coursera 24th Oct 4 3.3★ (3)
Advanced Java Concurrency via Coursera 24th Oct NA NA
Computational Neuroscience via Coursera 24th Oct 8 3.8★ (6)
Algorithms for DNA Sequencing via Coursera 24th Oct 4 4.5★ (16)
Probabilistic Graphical Models 1: Representation via Coursera 31st Oct 11 4.4★ (10)
submitted by dhawal to learnprogramming [link] [comments]

How to mine cryptocurrency with Raspberry Pi 3!(2018 ... Bitcoin Miner Setup : Raspberry Pi - YouTube 4 GH/s Raspberry PI Bitcoin Miner - PiMiner - YouTube Bitcoin Mining using Raspberry Pi - learn Bitcoin - YouTube LivingOnCrypto: Is it possible to mine profitable with a ...

For this purpose, I’m going to use my Raspberry Pi 3 model B, fully dedicated to mining task. Software preparation can be found in my previous articles on how to mine cryptocoins with Raspberry PI. I choose to mine using Pooled mining, as I think this can be more useful for short-term stats. Bitcoin is big – you probably know that already. Maybe you know someone who has made a bit of money by mining it on their computer. If getting started sounds like a bit of a headache and you’re not sure where to start, dig out your Raspberry Pi.You might be surprised, but Raspberry Pi is a tool to use for Bitcoin mining.. Before we go further, let’s make sure we understand all of the ... To make a Raspberry Pi bitcoin mining rig,For deploying the mining Rig in 2018, you will need Raspberry Pi ,A pool account , USB Bitcoin miner,Bitcoin Wallet Raspbian image SD card.When the installation is complete, you just have to save a file named wallet.dat, . this way make a Raspberry Pi bitcoin mining rig. The Bitcoin magic happens on silicon designed by 21 running as a co-processor to the Raspberry Pi.* That's not how the sellers pitch it, naturally: as the “first” computer with “native hardware and software” support for Bitcoin, “It provides a constant stream of Bitcoin and the software to make that Bitcoin useful for buying and ... Because the Raspberry Pi can’t stack up against ASIC devices or GPUs, it’s best to pick a coin that’s CPU-mineable. If you seek a profit, for cryptocurrency mining on a Raspberry Pi, look to alternate coins. Novaspirit reports solid performance with Magicoin mining on a Pi. Although, it’s been about a coin a day, which is somewhere from ...

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How to mine cryptocurrency with Raspberry Pi 3!(2018 ...

How to Install on Raspberry Pi http://raspberrypi4u.blogspot.com/2017/11/raspberry-pi-bitcoin-miner-monero-xmr.html email : [email protected] [email protected] Hey Everyone! This is a tutorial on how to setup a fully functioning bitcoin miner using a Raspberry pi. Raspberry pi's are extremely useful for programming ... ===== For More Information Click The Link To My Website http://www.fuzzthepiguy.tech/monero ===... In this Video i will show you how to Mine Monero with your Raspberry and 4 useful ways to use it in the crypto space. Time Stamps: 1:) 1:01 Bitcoin Core - Li... In this video we look at how to install a CPU miner on the Raspberry Pi 3 and how to mine with it. Commands: sudo apt-get install automake autoconf pkg-confi...

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