Bitcoin news: Cryptocurrency is scam ‘pyramid scheme’ says ...

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Bitcoin is a Pyramid Scheme | Cryptocurrency News

Bitcoin is a Pyramid Scheme | Cryptocurrency News submitted by Thornsb to BLOCKCHAINEDNews [link] [comments]

Hot news! Financial Times says Bitcoin is a pyramid scheme!

Hot news! Financial Times says Bitcoin is a pyramid scheme! submitted by Uberse to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Onecoin Leaders Indicted in the U.S. for Operating ‘Fraudulent Pyramid Scheme’ - The Bitcoin News

Onecoin Leaders Indicted in the U.S. for Operating ‘Fraudulent Pyramid Scheme’ - The Bitcoin News submitted by BlockchainMG to BlockchainMediaGroup [link] [comments]

[China's public security organs news] Bitcoin is pyramid schemes

submitted by bad100 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

r/bitcoin downvotes and hides bad news immediately. This post was downvoted and hidden within 6 minutes. I am now subscribed to r/buttcoin. Bitcoin is a dishonest pyramid scheme

bitcoin downvotes and hides bad news immediately. This post was downvoted and hidden within 6 minutes. I am now subscribed to buttcoin. Bitcoin is a dishonest pyramid scheme submitted by throw459725 to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

The Bitcoin 'pyramid scheme' continues to collapse - New York Post

The Bitcoin 'pyramid scheme' continues to collapse - New York Post submitted by ulros to fbitcoin [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] New BTC Auto Trading Program that isn't a pyramid scheme

The following post by SpazzzMonkey is being replicated because the post has been silently removed and some comments within it have been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7avqcu
The original post's content was as follows:
https://62edbe4c.usitech-int.com
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

12-21 20:33 - 'Pyramid scheme lack of new buyers' by /u/helios_01 removed from /r/Bitcoin within 15-25min

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Pyramid scheme lack of new buyers
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If something only has value if new people keep buying it in the hope it will keep going up in value, isn't that by definition a pyramid/ponzi scheme? /r/Bitcoin

If something only has value if new people keep buying it in the hope it will keep going up in value, isn't that by definition a pyramid/ponzi scheme? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

11-24 05:32 - 'If something only has value if new people keep buying it in the hope it will keep going up in value, isn't that by definition a pyramid/ponzi scheme?' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/sgasgdsgbdsg removed from /r/Bitcoin within 42-52min

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why people keep buying BCash I have no idea
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If something only has value if new people keep buying it in the hope it will keep going up in value, isn't that by definition a pyramid/ponzi scheme?
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11-05 11:53 - 'New BTC Auto Trading Program that isn't a pyramid scheme' (62edbe4c.usitech-int.com) by /u/SpazzzMonkey removed from /r/Bitcoin within 408-418min

New BTC Auto Trading Program that isn't a pyramid scheme
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Author: SpazzzMonkey
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Any “investment” scheme where you need to recruit people in order to make money or earn higher returns is a Ponzi Scheme.

I see many of these bitcoin schemes in SA now, where you “buy into” the network for a silver or gold membership and in exchange you earn higher returns on your investment and of course you need to recruit as many new members as possible. No regulated scheme would ever require you to get more members on board for a higher return rate. This is a Ponzi scheme or a pyramid scheme and people keep falling head over heels for these scams even though they go bust every single time.
submitted by Relativstranger to southafrica [link] [comments]

HEX is basically a scam, a pyramid scheme

HEX is a cryptocurrency token built on Ethereum that promises infinity rewards for staking. In the official website, it says:
HEX IS NOT A PONZI.
Yes, I agree. It's not a Ponzi scam. It's a Pyramid scam.
In HEX, no one owes you anything. You mint your own HEX rewards yourself when you end your stake. Like how Bitcoin miners mint their own Bitcoin rewards. You are the network.
That's basically minting value out of thin air. Wow, maybe HEX has an angel backing it that loves to give away free money.
There are no middlemen or managers in HEX. HEX rewards are dynamic like Bitcoin mining rewards. No one in the world can promise you how much you might make running HEX, because no one knows how valuable HEX will become. HEX puts you in charge!
The funds in traditional banks can give interest because they use it to provide loans for businesses. Without anything of that sort, how the hell can HEX continue to provide "high interests"?
It's totally a Pyramid Scheme. It works by giving people a false hope that their money is going up in value. But they can't withdraw it as it is locked up.
It can go up and up by making stupid people believe the balance sheet they see in their portfolio is what they will get. It's basically utilizing the greed of people with the lure of more money without actually giving more money.
All the new money or interest is generated from inflation. It works by getting more people to buy it with referral programs. But when enough idiots of brought it, there won't be any more losers to refer to.
Hence, the pyramid will collapse.
submitted by littleboy0k to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Spanish Prosecution Office Investigating Alleged Bitcoin Pyramid Scheme: $1 Billion in Investor ... (current BTC/USD price is $10,604.80)

Latest Bitcoin News:
Spanish Prosecution Office Investigating Alleged Bitcoin Pyramid Scheme: $1 Billion in Investor ...
Other Related Bitcoin Topics:
Bitcoin Price | Bitcoin Mining | Blockchain
The latest Bitcoin news has been sourced from the CoinSalad.com Bitcoin Price and News Events page. CoinSalad is a web service that provides real-time Bitcoin market info, charts, data and tools.
submitted by coinsaladcom to CoinSalad [link] [comments]

A Theory: The Crypto Ecosystem Hasn't Fully Collapsed Because It Has Found A Truly Ingenious Way To Monetize Human Stupidity and Greed

It's true that most traditional ponzi/pyramid schemes (Madoff etc...) collapse because they're obligated to provide unsustainable returns to their investors. However, pyramid schemes that force their sucker "investors" to eat their own losses typically don't collapse, at least not for a long time . Crypto is a perfect example of this dynamic at play, since exchanges are able to establish a consistent revenue stream of hard currency by manipulating the market against butters stupid enough to gamble on margin. The whole thing basically has the business model of a casino/pyramid scheme combined into one. Bitcoin doesn't run on electricity or software. It runs on sheer human stupidity, gullibility, and greed. MLMs like Harbalife largely function on the same principle (forcing the vast majority of suckers to eat their losses instead of guaranteeing an ultimately unsustainable return), which is why many MLMs have lasted for literally decades.
Something that u/thehoesmaketheman said on here that really stuck with me is that governments make pyramid schemes illegal because people love to "invest" in pyramid schemes otherwise. This can actually do profound damage to society if taken far enough, and while any given pyramid scheme might eventually collapse (depending on its structure), there will always be new schemes and new suckers. Crypto is a perfect space for generating both, as it is both digital and laughably unregulated. So I predict the Bitcoin/Crypto/Tether Rube Goldberg machine of stupidity and greed will keep going until governments finally wise up and make it illegal (if they ever do) because its just another scam at the end of the day. Unfortunately for our society and the planet, a lot of people in power seem to be fooled by trendy tech buzzwords like blockchain.
submitted by SpecialTurnip3 to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Censorship! 2 weeks of mod actions

As promised for a long time now, here's a breakdown mod actions in the past 2 weeks. I've previously done summaries for longer periods, but as it takes a few minutes to resolve each action, i limited the list to 1000 which corresponds to 2 weeks. The time period is roughly between the evenings of 28 April and 12 May.
I'm still busy with the details of the link and post removals. I've been working on this for 2 days now, so it'll take me until the weekend to get through them all. I haven't published the referenced addendum yet.

Bans

There were 8 permabans:
You are a bunch of stinking k####rs. It is going to be great to see all the k####rs die from Covid in the next few months. Viva Covid!!!
There were a few temporary bans. These are usually issued when users ignore multiple requests or warnings about our rules. These are issued in increments of days. It would be useful to issue one for an hour or two, rather than the minimum of 1 day.
Temp bans for abusive language:
Abusive language has been challenged before with accusations of it being anything from "not a school playground" to "1984-era doublethink". It's not acceptable to insult a stranger you're having a conversation with in public, then it's not acceptable to do so here.
Temp bans for misleading content:
And other miscellaneous reasons:
For anyone thinking that we ban whomever our ANC masters tell us to....tell them that I haven't received my kickbacks yet.

Unbans

Beyond the temporary bans coming to an end, there was one permanent ban that was removed, and that was for justluckyme2 who was incorrectly given a permaban, but a temp ban was intended. That was quickly corrected.

Mark submission as spam

This is an action that we use to help train the spam filters. Sometimes we remove spam posts when we should be marking them as spam - which removes the submission as well.
These are sometimes accompanied with bans. We love hearing about everyone's businesses or side hustles, as long as they don't violate reddit's TOS. If you want to but are unsure, send us a modmail. We'll typically direct you to https://www.redditinc.com/advertising

Mark comment as spam

A similar reason, but applies to comments
You might need to use a service like snew to view these.

Approve post

As a part of reddit and our own spam and abuse protection, posts are sometimes caught incorrectly. There are many reasons why a post is incorrectly removed. We aren't told the exact reason for these removals by reddit's spam filters and AutoModerator. While we have our own custom AutoModerator rules (That remove posts to known fake news sites, or flag comments that have some slurs), reddit has their own super-set of AutoMod rules we can't see.
If you can't see your post appearing when looking at the new queue in another browser, then send us a message. We often go through the mod queue which lists removed posts, but might not get to every one.
There were 91 posts approved by moderators. I'll list them in the addendum.

Approve comment

For a similar reason, comments are caught in a filter of sorts. We then approve the comment - if they were incorrectly caught - or confirm removal - if they were correctly caught.
There were 141 comments approved by moderators. I'll list them in the addendum.

Remove post

The very meaning of censorship! No-one likes their content being removed, but we remove posts that don't comply with the sub rules.
There were 346 posts in total removed. 196 of these were removed by AutoModerator for varying reasons. 91 were manually approved by us, a few were confirmed as being spam, but a lot were left as removed. Ideally we should have confirmed removal or approved each of them. Sorry if yours slipped through the cracks. That leaves 150 posts that were removed by moderators.
I'm doing a detailed report on these, so check back later.

Remove comment

You're censoring my views! Comments are generally moderated less than submissions. A post about a vacation in Thailand - for example - might not be relevant, but having a discussion about your Thai vacation in comments is just fine.
There were 302 comments removed. 188 were removed by AutoMod, leaving 113 comments being removed by mods.
I'm doing a detailed report on these, so check back later.

Edit flair

Occasionally someone selects the wrong flair for their post and moderators correct it. There were a few posts whose flair was changed by us:

Distinguish comment or Sticky comment

A moderator can distinguish their comment to appear different to other comments. We normally use them when acting in capacity as a mod, rather than in our own personal capacities (yes, it's possible for these to be distinct). Public removal reasons are distinguished, stickied comments. See addendum for the full list.
There are two ways to provide feedback to why a comment or post was removed. Via a comment, or via modmail. Myself and lengau often do public comments, while other mods send messages. You'll see that some are removed or deleted, because the request (translation, source, etc) was fulfilled.

Lock post or comment

This allows moderators to prevent comments being added to a post or replies made to a comment.
There were no locked posts and a few locked comments. All locked comments were some of the distinguished comments listed in the previous section.

Mute user

This is a feature in modmail - a common messaging system viewable by all mods - that allows communication from a user to be blocked for two days. If we ban a user, there's nothing stopping them from sending us love letters, like the one listed previously. They are often done to stop abusive message being thrown our way for a few days. There were 6 mutes. 3 resulting from permabans, 2 from temporary bans and 1 from a post removal.
Honestly, if we make a mistake with a ban or a removal, don't attack us. Chat with us.

Admin actions

We can see when reddit's admins do moderator actions in our sub. There have been no admin actions in this time period.
In case you're interested, the only action recently listed was performed a month ago, and was the removal of one comment: https://reddit.com/southafrica/comments/fkmczc/walied_josephs_was_in_picknpay_early_this_morning/fktjvcj/

But how can I trust that the data is correct? lovethebacon is clearly a paid ANC agent.

The other mods can verify this information. Use services like snew or removeddit to view removals. And can someone please tell Paul Mashatile that I haven't received my paycheck....ever.
It's worth nothing that different mods have different moderation styles. We don't have a fixed set of guidelines on what should be done in what circumstances, but it's up to each mod to do what they think is best for the sub. If any decision made by the mods should be reversed, let us know, here or in modmail.
submitted by lovethebacon to southafrica [link] [comments]

Q ~ The Future Currency of Payments

Initiative Q is an attempt by ex-PayPal guys to create a new payment system instead of payment cards that were designed in the 1950s. The system uses its own currency, the Q, and to get people to start using the system once it's ready they are allocating Qs for free to people that sign up now (the amount drops as more people join - so better to join early).
Signing up is free and they only ask for your name and an email address. There's nothing to lose but if this payment system becomes a world leading payment method your Qs can be worth a lot. If you missed getting bitcoin seven years ago, you wouldn't want to miss this.
Here is my invite link: https://initiativeq.com/invite/fV-3dZmM2
Pagkatapos niyong mag-sign up direct message niyo ko para ma-verify ko account niyo. Ito yung paraan nila para hindi siya magaya sa pyramid scheme using an invite link from it's previous user kaya dito pa lang alam mo ng trusted siya.
Only requirement lang is email address to register. Sa ngayon nasa reservation phase pa lang sila, pag dumami na yung network(User) and ready to launch na mas magiging malaki yung value niya. Ang goal nila is magkaroon ng 1Q to 1$ ratio and sa pag sign up pa lang almost 1,300Q na agad yung binibigay. So NO RISK = HIGH REWARDS.
submitted by Hearthles to beermoneyph [link] [comments]

09-10 13:27 - '[quote] From the article.' by /u/MisteryYourMamaMan removed from /r/news within 0-10min

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Chicago resident [Redacted] was identified as the event’s organizer. According to a preliminary investigation, Aguilera organized the event for Forex, a company with a pyramid scheme dedicated to the sale of Bitcoin by recruiting and investing. The majority of those attending the event were “traders”—young US residents invited to the party. Most of them came from Florida, Texas, and other states with high COVID-19 numbers. Anyone who flies to the island is supposed to quarantine for at least two weeks, if they don’t present a negative result of the COVID-19 test.
From the article.
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/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/g8jqnthe_blackmail_email_scam_part_5//
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

Door to door scams

As a general rule, you should not engage with door to door salesmen. If you are interested in the product they are selling, check online first.
Selling Magazines
Someone or a group will come to your door and offer to sell a magazine subscription. Often the subscriptions are not for the duration or price you were told, and the magazines will often have tough or impossible cancellation policies.
Energy sales
Somebody will come to your door claiming to be from an energy company. They will ask to see your current energy bill so that they can see how much you pay. They will then offer you a discount if you sign up with them, and promise to handle everything with your old provider. Some of these scammers will "slam" you, by using your account number that they saw on your bill to switch you to their service without authorization, and some will scam you by charging higher prices than the ones you agreed on.
Security system scams
Scammers will come to your door and ask about your security system, and offer to sell you a new one. These scammers are either selling you overpriced low quality products, or are casing your home for a future burglary.
They ask to enter your home
While trying to sell you whatever, they suddenly need to use your bathroom, or they've been writing against the wall and ask to use your table instead. Or maybe they just moved into the neighborhood and want to see how you decorate for ideas.
They're scoping out you and your place. They want to see what valuables you have, how gullible you are, if you have a security system or dogs, etc.

Street scams

Begging With a Purpose
"I just need a few more dollars for the bus," at the bus station, or "I just need $5 to get some gas," at a gas station. There's also a variation where you will be presented with a reward: "I just need money for a cab to get uptown, but I'll give you sports tickets/money/a date/a priceless vase."
Three Card Monte, Also Known As The Shell Game
Unbeatable. The people you see winning are in on the scam.
Drop and Break
You bump into someone and they drop their phone/glasses/fancy bottle of wine/priceless vase and demand you pay them back. In reality, it's a $2 pair of reading glasses/bottle of three-buck-chuck/tasteful but affordable vase.
CD Sales
You're handed a free CD so you can check out the artist's music. They then ask for your name and immediately write it on the CD. Once they've signed your name, they ask you for money, saying they can't give it to someone else now. Often they use dry erase markers, or cheap CD sleeves. Never use any type of storage device given to you by a random person, as the device can contain malware.
White Van Speaker Scam
You're approached and offered speakers/leather jackets/other luxury goods at a discount. The scammer will have an excuse as to why the price is so low. After you buy them, you'll discover that they are worthless.
iPhone Street Sale
You're approached and shown an iPhone for sale, coming in the box, but it's open and you can see the phone. If you buy the phone, you'll get an iPhone box with no iPhone, just some stones or cheap metal in it to weigh it down.
Buddhist Monk Pendant
A monk in traditional garb approaches you, hands you a gold trinket, and asks for a donation. He holds either a notebook with names and amounts of donation (usually everyone else has donated $5+), or a leaflet with generic info. This is fairly common in NYC, and these guys get aggressive quickly.
Friendship Bracelet Scam More common in western Europe, you're approached by someone selling bracelets. They quickly wrap a loop of fabric around your finger and pull it tight, starting to quickly weave a bracelet. The only way to (easily) get it off your hand is to pay. Leftover sales
This scam involves many different items, but the idea is usually the same: you are approached by someone who claims to have a large amount of excess inventory and offers to sell it to you at a great price. The scammer actually has low quality items and will lie to you about the price/origin of the items.
Dent repair scams
Scammers will approach you in public about a dent in your car and offer to fix it for a low price. Often they will claim that they are mechanics. They will not fix the dent in your car, but they will apply large amounts of wax or other substances to hide the dent while they claim that the substance requires time to harden.
Gold ring/jewelry/valuable item scam
A scammer will "find" a gold ring or other valuable item and offers to sell it to you. The item is fake and you will never see the scammer again.
Distraction theft
One person will approach you and distract you, while their accomplice picks your pockets. The distraction can take many forms, but if you are a tourist and are approached in public, watch closely for people getting close to you.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

BTC Global – A Huge Ponzi Scheme

Oh No! Another Cryptocurrency Scam

Since Bitcoin was created back in 2008, there have been numerous shady individuals and companies for that matter that have used the hype to their advantage to facilitate cryptocurrency scams. These shrewd schemes conned thousands upon thousands of people who knew virtually nothing about cryptocurrency but wanted to invest in this alluring venture. 2018 is underway but here is this year’s top cryptocurrency scam thus far:

BTC Global

Just a little over two weeks ago BTC Global collapsed and Broker Complaint Registry has received numerous complaints pertaining to this fraudulent broker. The company claimed to be an exclusive platform providing unparalleled earnings through valid binary trading services, but that was unfortunately not the case. Here are excerpts from there website:
“We are backed by our founding trader at Steven Twain.”
This “Steven Twain” character is not a real individual.
“Steven has 6 years of experience trading binary options with consistent success, over the last 3 years he has started providing trading services for other large account holders ($10,000+ only).”
I have not come across any trading history pertaining to Steven Twain.
“Through our partnership with Steven, BTC Global have secured access to guaranteed 14% WEEKLY returns from as little as $1,000 in your account. We have also secured extra returns to pay out as referral commissions should you decide to share this opportunity with others! There are very few legitimate opportunities to get the kind of returns on investment BTC Global is offering so we encourage you to get involved as soon as possible to avoid disappointment.”
How can a legitimate company guarantee any sort of returns?
In BTC Global there were two ways one could earn:

  1. Return on investment, which was 14% of the dollar amount that was invested, paid weekly in BTC.
  2. Team shares or commissions on the people that the investor recruited or referred (think of a pyramid scheme).

BTC Global – a textbook Ponzi scheme.

The definition of a Ponzi scheme is as follows:
A deceitful investing scam guaranteeing high rates of return with little to no risk to investors. The Ponzi scheme produces returns for earlier investors by procuring new investors. BTC Global certainly fits the bill
Investment values generally go up and down over a duration of time, especially the ones that offer potentially high yields. If an investment consistently generates the same returns despite the market conditions or guarantees these high returns that is cause for pause.
Additionally, Ponzi schemes usually involve investments that have not been registered with the SEC, FSB or any other regulatory agency. Obviously, registration is pivotal as enables investors to access pivotal information pertaining to the firm’s management, services, products and most importantly finances.
Lastly and most importantly if you do not receive a “scheduled” payment or incur difficulty when trying to cash out your investment that is the biggest red flag. Those who promote Ponzi schemes regularly ask investors to “roll over” investments and often promise returns in excess of the amount that was rolled over.

How to protect yourself from a cryptocurrency scam

Although we have just talked about the BTC Global scam, this is not the only one. The very best way to ensure your funds are safe is to know how to identify and avoid ponzi schemes like BTC Global.
Stay far away from ICOs, unidentified companies and companies that do not provide suitable information. Be sure that creator’s names and all team members are publicly listed and verified and, if reviews give consistent negative feedback it best to avoid that cryptocurrency broker.
If you have fallen victim to a cryptocurrency scam, send a complaint to at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]), and we will do our very best to get into contact with you as soon as we can to initiate your funds recovery process.
submitted by gskobir to u/gskobir [link] [comments]

Why Ethereum Problems Make UMI the Flagship Among the New Generation Cryptocurrencies

Why Ethereum Problems Make UMI the Flagship Among the New Generation Cryptocurrencies

https://preview.redd.it/8skuypxp9lj51.jpg?width=1023&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=ba5a38ba592428f92dc7c1943a780ff127132875
Ethereum cryptocurrency that comes second in terms of capitalization on the crypto market is traditionally seen as fast and profitable. However, over the last few weeks it's had a rough patch. Since early August, the network has had huge queues of transactions pending processing while fees have skyrocketed and surpassed the historical high.
The main issue though is that even fees of a few dollars per transfer don't help get rid of the“traffic jams”. The cause of this is numerous DeFi projects and a huge number of financial pyramids based on the Ethereum platform. Both generate excessive load on the network.
The situation is downright unpleasant, and our users might question whether the UMI network could face a similar challenge? We'd like to assure you it could not. The UMI network is by default protected against these problems — it cannot have “traffic jams”, fees or financial pyramids. But first things first.
How has the Ethereum network ground to a halt?
In its report dated August 4, Arcane Research that provides analysis within the field of cryptocurrency stated that over the previous week the daily size of transaction fees in the Ethereum network has surged up to a record high for over two and a half years. On August 3, the median value #%D0%9F%D1%80%D0%B8%D0%BC%D0%B5%D1%80_%D0%B8%D1%81%D0%BF%D0%BE%D0%BB%D1%8C%D0%B7%D0%BE%D0%B2%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%B8%D1%8F)of the fee amounted to $0.82, with the overall amount of transaction fees totaling $2 mln. However, it only signaled the start of real problems.
Over the next week, fees continued to grow and by August 11 the median fee value almost doubled equaling $1.57. Larry Cermak, an expert at a big analytical and news-making crypto portal The Block, wrote in his August 15 tweet that over a week the total amount of transaction fees in the Ethereum network totaled $34.5 mln, having surpassed its historical high. Meanwhile, in the Bitcoin network that is seen as too expensive the fees were almost four times lower at $9 mln.
The total fee amount paid by cryptocurrency users over a week:
  • Ethereum — $34.5 mln;
  • Bitcoin — $9 mln;
  • Monero — $2,240;
  • Tezos — $1,876;
  • Cardano — $1,615;
  • XRP — $1,138;
  • BSV — $1,102;
  • Stellar — $1,059;
  • Bitcoin Cash — $1,027;
  • UMI — $0. Let's talk about it a little later.

https://preview.redd.it/z9azd9v6alj51.png?width=1600&format=png&auto=webp&s=25c365d6e14665ecda4a2b8d19b2fc57dd5cde1e
Historical Growth Chart for Ethereum Fees. Source
The existing situation shows that Ethereum is actually not as fast and profitable as commonly cited. Additionally, this could happen to almost any cryptocurrency except UMI that charges no fees whatsoever. We will tell you why.
Why have these problems emerged?
There is nothing unoriginal: the Ethereum network simply can't handle an increased load. Arcane Research analysts consider that a principal cause of this situation is the constantly increasing number of the DeFi ecosystem projects built on the Ethereum blockchain. Their number is growing all the time which causes the overload of the network. As of August 12, the total amount of funds in DeFi applications reached $4.3 billion which is 19.5% higher than that in the past week. At the time of writing this article, the amount surged to $6.21 billion. You can see the current data here. What is the most unpleasant about DeFi protocols is that a lot of them are scam projects.
Which is not the worst part though. There is also another factor that significantly slows down the Ethereum network. There are a lot of pyramid-like projects that are built on the EOS platform and use smart contracts. One of them is SmartWay Forsage, which regularly overloads the network with a large number of transactions, causes traffic jams, and, consequently, leads to increased fees (keep in mind that Ethereum miners choose transactions with a higher commission). Vitalik Buterin, the co-founder of Ethereum, revealed his disapproval of the SmartWay Forsage methodology and asked them to "leave and not pollute Ethereum ecology in the future". However, the project is slow to do this — it continues to deceive users.
This is only the tip of the iceberg of scam projects which abounds on the EOS network –– they continually emerge, work for a while, then go down as scams and are replaced with new ones. This never-ending stream of "investment projects" based on the Ponzi scheme overloads the system. This is the reason why Adam Back, a pioneer of the crypto industry and founder of the technology company Blockstream, equated Ethereum with such infamous projects as Onecoin and Bitconnect. Adam Back's solid dig at Ethereum became the subject of much debate among crypto enthusiasts.
Of course, it all doesn't mean that Ethereum is a bad cryptocurrency. On the contrary, it has a lot of advantages over other coins. But all that has happened exposes Ethereum's faults which must be eliminated. The problem is that they may not be fixable. It is far from certain that the developers will be able to get rid of all the defects as the system has huge scalability problems.
The crypto community has to admit that Ethereum, like other first-generation cryptocurrencies, has issues with capacity, fees, and scalability and is gradually becoming obsolete.
2020 is the time for young innovative cryptocurrencies such as UMI.
UMI is the flagship of new-generation cryptocurrencies.
In real fact, any cryptocurrency could face it. Each cryptocurrency charges fees which typically surge when the network is overloaded or the price is going up. Everyone will remember 2017 when in line with price growth and the network's overload Bitcoin transaction fee reached a high of around $40.
But when it comes to UMI, it works the other way round. The UMI network's advantages are high capacity, no fees, and scaling possibilities. It uses the best and fastest crypto industry solutions and excludes all inefficient methods by default. Smart optimization in combination with the Proof-of-Authority technology operating on the master node basis enables almost instant payments.
At the stage of network testing, an incredibly high capacity was achieved:
  • up to 4,369 transactions per second;
  • up to 262,140 transactions per minute;
  • up to 15,728,400 transactions per hour;
  • up to 377,481,600 transactions per day.
Ethereum processes about 20 transactions per second. It means that the UMI network can process transactions that Ethereum processes over a year in 1 to 5 days — and with no fees.
https://preview.redd.it/rwohnov3alj51.png?width=1125&format=png&auto=webp&s=4329b75c0bd8b7a22276b529f5ca433d17a0874f
The UMI network can process transactions that Ethereum processes over a year in a few days and with no fees. More details
What is more important is that less than 0.001% of the network's overall potential is used now. The UMI network has a lot of reserve capacity and can handle hundreds of thousands of times heavier load. Moreover, with scaling possibilities, UMI can keep up with the times. The UMI code ensures the safe introduction of any upgrades — the network can be easily modified and scaled with cutting edge technology solutions. In other words, traffic jams will never pose a problem for us. UMI will instantly process all transactions, with no fees. Always.
https://preview.redd.it/t0068th0alj51.png?width=544&format=png&auto=webp&s=019f46ec8c093480c4638cf098312a5a146134a8
A real-time speedometer displays the number of transactions processed by the UMI network per second. Link
Additionally, unlike Ethereum and other cryptocurrencies, the UMI's staking smart contract prevents possibilities of any pyramid schemes, meaning eliminates their negative influence. Our staking is completely safe and secured against scammers. Read more about this in our article. Any UMI staking structure could work forever. In other words, you can multiply your coins at a rate of up to 40% per month for an indefinitely long period of time.
UMI doesn't inherit the disadvantages of the first-generation cryptocurrencies. This is an innovative, carefully designed network based on state-of-the-art technologies. UMI is an ambitious step toward the future. And we're making it together right now!
Sincerely yours, UMI team
submitted by UMITop to u/UMITop [link] [comments]

Idea | Tip Nano to creators

Hey guys, my name is Tolik and I'm new to Nano.
I would like to tell you a bit about myself, and then about some ideas that I would like to share with you :)
I'm a content creator form Israel, and I have about 65k subscribers over my 3 channels. I'm also the first Israeli partnered on Twitch and been doing that for 8 years now.
Had a lot of fun with it for the first few years, playing my favorite games and earning good money, and eventually burning out hating the game that got me all my following. Our (Israeli) community exploded on youtube, but to make the most of it you need to make mindless trendy content, playing trendy and pretty childish games. I did that for a while, but it was too hard for my mind and I ended up burning out hard stepping away for a long while.
Back in 2013 I first stumbled upon the world of crypto and realized the potential of the blockchain and the implementation of that technology in our world. Not enough to buy enough to get rich, but I never even considered that it could get to the volumes it got to now. In 2017 when it exploded, I realized I had some leftover coins from 2013-14 and cashed out a few thousand dollars, with the pain it could have been millions if I was a little more aware. Oh Well.
A few years ago, I got into the world of self-development and got a new perspective on life. Doing only what I love and grooming a small but good community on youtube, not caring about trends, views, and money in my pocket.
A few days ago, a colleague of mine started to promote some unknown coin to his child viewers, basically, the premise is a coin that you could mine on your phone. Immediately I had some red flags popping off my mind, especially because he promoted some shady CSGO gambling sites that I didn't even want to look into. He of course had his promotion code for registering to the gambling site, and using the mentioned crypto (downloading the app).
If you can mine it on your phone, what would stop you using an expensive setup and just dominate the market? The fact that he advertised it as a get rich scheme, and the fact that it's a referral pyramid network, does not seem safe.
After looking into it I did not see any promise, especially after I found so many altcoins with big communities that his crypto didn't have, information that did not add up, and a bunch of weird stuff going on.
Because I started researching the crypto world (after so many years not being aware of what happened to it), youtube started suggesting me videos about it, one of them was u/SonderDev 's nanoPaint (Sorry I made SpongeBobs eye red) and started doing some research on nano and the technology. For 3 days I devoured all the info I can, reading most of the posts here on reddit, and joining on Discord and TG. I again felt that butterfly feeling in my gut, the one I felt so many years ago when I found out about bitcoin (and some other rare occasions). So much potential, and I kind of feel I am already late to the party, and yet, my mind can't stop thinking about what is possible.
Now to the good stuff! Donations(tips) to streamers and content creators were always a huge part of our revenue. But we had a lot of problems with it - High fees, making small donations pretty much impossible, and the fear of someone charging you back and having you pay the fees for every donation that got charged back. I had someone give me about $2k for the span of two months with small donations, ended up charging all that money back, and having me pay $10 for each of his donations, even if they were under that amount. PayPal is pretty crazy.
Also, If you consider something like Patreon (a monthly donation for a project or a creator you like for benefits) they also charge extra for their fee, and people can still charge you back, even though they will handle it, you still give them the benefits. Twitch takes a huge cut for subscribers (user pays $4.99 and I get as little as $1.70) and youtube are getting about 30% for their cut.
See where I'm going with this? As proof of concept, a simple donation website/app could be made. You send the creator any amount of nano, it pops up on the screen for everyone to see. People would love the idea to impact the stream with as little money the creator allows. That would start up a conversation, people would start seeing the technology in action, how fast and feeless everything is going.
Not to mention an integrated service could be made that is similar to delegate.it (allows users to do tasks for nano/fiat) in this instance, the tasks could be - follow the creator on Twitter, Instagram, like his posts and whatever else he decides, and it could be cheap, because people would be doing it to pop up on stream and help the creator, not for the actual fiat amount of the nano given. killing 3 birds with one stone. Promoting nano, allowing everybody a voice to a degree they choose, and promoting himself to his viewers.
If this works, we could either go to one of the 2 biggest platforms (StreamLabs and StreamElements (who are Israeli and I know the 2 founders personally)) and they would integrate it to their already build system, or develop something to solely promote nano. We could reach out to smaller streamers that have small dedicated communities, not many donations and revenue coming in and allow them to use our system to promote their content and interact with their viewers.
A few more ideas I have in mind for a project like that:
For the donations (tips)
• Having different donation alerts for different QR codes that you scan. Similarly to what NanoPaint accomplishes, we could have a different QR code to scan for an alert that the user chooses to show up.
• Coloring the Camera frame - similarly to NanoPaint, drawing pixels on the frame of the camera of the streamer, changing it in real-time for nano.
• Having text to speech for the alert
• Have your donation impact the streamer in AR (putting something on his face or head).
Crowd Funding
• Donation goal that will make a purchase only if it gets there - setting up an X day goal to buy a new GPU for example, and having people contribute to it, and if it's reached, it automatically makes the order from amazon or wherever (having the data safe with our service), and if it's not - fully refunding the users. It could be a daily goal for pizza or whatever they choose. It will allow integration with businesses that would work with us.
• Stream goals - if we get to X Nano this stream, 24 hour stream tomorrow! If we won't, get your nano back! Would encourage people to participate even if they are not sure the goal will be met, have the assurance that the full amount would be refunded if it did not get there.
• Challenges - starting a bounty challenge, for example, have an Ace in CSGO (kill all 5 enemies) and get X amount of nano. If you didn't, money goes back. the crowd could vote on it having more interaction and validating if the challenge is complete.
Voting
• Have people engage with polls in real-time with nano, could scan their option to vote, and even get refunded if their option did not win, encouraging them to vote for their favorite option, even if it seems unlikely to win.
User Battles
• Having people start a challenge of a game, in an app or on the web, or perhaps even something random like gambling, and having it appear on stream for everybody to witness. Maybe even challenging the streamer for a nano incentive or someone else who watches.
Chat
• Having an on-screen chat that changes the colors and design of the people who donated with nano, and linked their account. more incentive to donate.
Stream Sponsors
• Having a rotating banner on-screen at all times, allowing users to pay nano to show their banner. As an auction or a price set from the creator.
Most of these ideas occurred to me as I was writing this post, and I'm sure we could think of better ones with some effort. Some of them are already implemented on the websites that were mention above, however, having the power and speed of the nano is a game-changer IMHO.
So why am I writing this post? First, just to share with you and get to know you better, maybe spark an idea or a motivation for anyone to do something good for nano.
Second, money is tight now, moved back to my parents due to the pandemic, hard to find a decent job as we have more than %20 of the people in Israel looking for a job and as I mentioned before the content I make is not very profitable. I can't afford to invest money in this idea, and I lack the skills to do it myself. So maybe if it's good someone else could.
If, however, someone would be inclined to help make this a reality, I would appreciate any comments, suggestions, investment of time, or money in testing this out. I have a dedicated community with thousands of people that will be aware of nano if we'll do it, years of experience in this field, and not to mention that I'm in good relations with most of the other content creators and platforms here in Israel, and some international.
Discord: ToLy#2657
Feel free to DM me at any time :)
Nice to meet you, and thank you for reading.
submitted by tolikr94 to nanocurrency [link] [comments]

Money man says bitcoin could be a pyramid scheme - YouTube Is Bitcoin a Ponzi Scheme or a Pyramid Scheme? - YouTube Bitconnect Experiment 02 - Is Bitconnect a Pyramid Scheme? Bitcoin is a PYRAMID SCHEME Says Peter Schiff - Here’s Why He’s Wrong Is Bitcoin a Pyramid or Ponzi Scheme?

LendingTree Chief Economist Tendayi Kapfidze told reporters at Yahoo Finance January 1st that Bitcoin is “a pyramid scheme” and a scam with no particular utility. Kapfidze made the comments just after co-panelist Oliver Pursche, Chief Market Strategist at Bruderman Asset Management, described his own cryptocurrency investments and said, “(T)here’s something here. The Bitcoin ‘pyramid scheme’ continues to collapse ... is a pyramid scheme. A fraud. ... Would you like to receive desktop browser notifications about breaking news and other major stories? Lending Tree Chier Economist, Tendayi Kapfidze recently commented on Bitcoin, calling it a pyramid scheme, so here is why his view may be wrong. Over the course of the last 11 years, Bitcoin has traveled a long way for an unknown new invention to the largest cryptocurrency in the world, with a market cap of $130 billion. He accomplished 2 things. 1) He called Bitcoin a "Pyramid Scheme" 2) He called Bitcoin a "Scam". In the eyes of most uninformed viewers, that is all they heard and that is exactly what he was paid to do. So, the real question is, who is Yahoo Finance? Bitcoin is a pyramid scheme, economist says. Nick Rose ... the stock rose 12% on news that Luckin, along with 43 fraud-friendly firms that abetted Luckin in the scandal, got hit with a 61 million ...

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Money man says bitcoin could be a pyramid scheme - YouTube

Bitconnect Ponzi Scheme Exit Scams with CryptoNick! NEWS! Bitraged. ... don't invest in any pyramid schemes they are always a bad idea! ... CryptoNick BitConnect UPDATE & his Bitcoin Mastery ... Instagram Live බිට් කොයින් පිරමිඩ් ස්කීම් එකක්ද? Is Bitcoin a Pyramid Scheme? https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/create ... nasgo going hard pyramid, new hampshire accepting bitcoin soon, and more!! Sign up with coinbase. buy or sell 100 dollars in crypto currency and get 10 dollars of bitcoin for free with this link ... In this video, I discuss whether or not Bitcoin is a Pyramid scheme or a Ponzi scheme. I conclude that it is neither, simply because: 1) Bitcoin is decentralized, not run by a corporation or ...

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